InfoWars Users Allegedly Sent Death Threats To Judge In Alex Jones’ Sandy Hook Lawsuit

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A new court document posted by controversial conservative social media personality and filmmaker Mike Cernovich reveals that InfoWars users allegedly threatened Bridgeport Superior Court Judge Barbara N. Bellis, who is handling Alex Jones’ Sandy Hook case. The court was reportedly contacted by the Connecticut State Police, who were informed by the FBI that threats were made against Bellis by individuals that were on Jones’ InfoWars site.

The revelation comes just two days after CNN reported that Jones was sanctioned by Bellis for suggested that Christopher Mattei — a lawyer for the Sandy Hook families, who are suing Jones for allegedly pushing conspiracy theories that the 2012 shooting was staged — tried to frame him with child pornography. The 45-year-old host made the comment during a rant on his Friday InfoWars show last week.

Bellis called Jones’ behavior on the show “indefensible,” “unconscionable,” and “possibly criminal behavior,” and denied the defense the opportunity to pursue special motions to dismiss the case moving forward with the lawsuit. In addition, the court is awarding attorneys fees and filing fees to the Sandy Hook lawyers that Jones attacked in his broadcast.

In the court filing addressing the incident, the plaintiffs called Jones’ comments “threats against counsel… made to a very large audience,” and added that “the Court has an obligation to protect the attorneys, parties, and the judicial process.”

Jones’ attorney Norman Pattis said Monday night in a court filing that Jones “became impassioned” and admitted that Jones’ comments “made direct reference to plaintiffs’ counsel.”

As The Inquisitr previously reported, Jones claims that the child pornography that was sent to Sandy Hook lawyers was the result of a malware attack that placed the pornography on his computers. A subsequent article by InfoWars editor-at-large Paul Joseph Watson suggested that the pornography was located in a spam folder in emails that were “very hostile” and “contained threats against Jones.”

“I’ve spoken to federal prosecutors, they regard you as a victim,” Jones’ attorney Norman Pattis said. “They do not regard you in any way as a suspect.”

“I spoke to federal prosecutors last week,” he added. “They report that there is no indication anyone at InfoWars knowingly possessed child pornography.”

Per standard procedure for ongoing investigations, the FBI has not commented on the child pornography found in Jones’ files. They are now responsible for determining if Jones knew the pornographic images were on the InfoWars server data — which Gizmodo reports may have come from Free Speech Systems servers — after they were sent to the Sandy Hook lawyers.