Alex Trebek Appears With Wife, Jean, At Daytime Emmy Awards, Wins For Outstanding Game Show Host

The 'Jeopardy!' host received a standing ovation from the audience.

Alex Trebek accepts the Daytime Emmy Award
Alberto E. Rodriguez / Getty Images

The 'Jeopardy!' host received a standing ovation from the audience.

Alex Trebek was spotted escorting wife Jean as they arrived at the Daytime Emmy Awards on Sunday at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium in Pasadena, California, reports The Daily Mail. Trebek and his wife married in 1990 and have two children together, Matthew, 29, and Emily, 26.

The television personality was also observed at the award show chatting it up with fellow game show host Wink Martindale. He walked away with the Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Game Show Host for the night, along with a standing ovation from the crowd.

This was one of the first major public appearances for Trebek following his recent diagnosis of stage 4 pancreatic cancer.

In a video announcement, the TV game show host mentioned that while his prognosis was poor, he would not let the low odds keep him from fighting cancer. He also noted that he would host Jeopardy! for as long as possible.

After Trebek’s return to the Jeopardy! set in March, he thanked fans for all the support he had received in a message captioned “Thank you.”

“Hi everyone, I just wanna take a few moments to say thanks to the — believe it or not — hundreds of thousands of people who have sent in tweets, texts, emails, cards, and letters wishing me well following my recent health announcement.

“…I did want you to know that I do read everything I receive and I am thankful for the kind words, the prayers, and the advice you have offered, and I’m extremely touched by the warmth you have expressed in your comments to me.”

Last week, Trebek made an appearance on Good Morning America in his first live interview since announcing his cancer diagnosis, reported People.

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He told Robin Roberts, who is a breast cancer survivor, about the support he had received from others, saying that it had made a difference in his well-being.

Concerning his physical health, he shared that his oncologist said he was currently doing well, in spite of the fact that he did not always feel well.

He candidly admitted while he had previously dealt with kidney stones and ruptured discs, he could handle pain; however, what he was not used to handling was the sudden feelings of deep sadness he would experience.

However, he still maintained his trademark jovial attitude, joking that the whole experience made him realize he was “a bit of a wuss.” He noted that he was still fighting, with steady weight and blood counts, as well as cancer indicators that were going down. He indicated that he would be having chemotherapy the following week and would then receive a review to find out where things stood.