Donald Trump Gets Schooled On Stollen After A Hilarious Typo

Sean GallupGetty Images

Sunday was a bad typo day for Donald Trump, who first mangled the spelling of the state of Kentucky (“Kentuky”), then used the word stollen instead of stolen to talk about how he was ripped off by Democrats during his first two years in office. This caused many people to post photos of German fruitcake for the president in order to show him the difference between the two words.

Trump posted on Twitter that even though he has had great success, he can never get back what was “stollen” from him.

“Despite the tremendous success that I have had as President, including perhaps the greatest ECONOMY and most successful first two years of any President in history, they have stollen two years of my (our) Presidency (Collusion Delusion) that we will never be able to get back…”

While a number of people explained the difference between the two words, describing stollen as a German baked good, popular at Christmas, often with marzipan, journalist Kaz Weida shared a mock recipe, saying that you start with a 72-year-old fruitcake, mix in white supremacy and conspiracy theories, and serve with “a side of delusion.”

Others teased the subtle difference between the words running and ruining, saying that “this is the man who is running our country, I mean ruining.”

TMZ reports that stollen is perhaps Donald Trump’s “tastiest” typo yet, and while people have grown weary of his multipart rants, they are still amused by a good old fashioned typo, especially one that evokes a tasty and fruity European holiday bread.

Three hours after the original posting, the spelling still hadn’t been corrected, and TMZ joked about another typo which had people giggling for days. “Covfefe and stollen… now there’s a delicious pairing.”

Though Donald Trump’s typo #covfefe was never explained, then press secretary Sean Spicer had stated that those who need to know what “covfefe means already know,” said The Inquisitr. It was late one night in 2017 when Trump, tweeting near midnight, posted a sentence which took on a life of its own.

“Despite the constant negative press covfefe.”

That one tweet launched a humorous Twitter storm that went on throughout the night and into the next day and had every late night talk host from James Corden to Jimmy Fallon trying their hand at “covfefe” jokes. But some jumped on the bandwagon right away, making up song lyrics and using the term in a sentence, sometimes as a noun, other times as a verb.

The amusing memes went on for days, with one popular one, in particular, showing a photo of Trump looking wistful with a slogan which read, “Maybe he’s born with it, maybe it’s #covfefe.”