Michael Jackson Is Defended From ‘Leaving Neverland’ Allegations In New Amazon Prime Documentary

A new documentary seeks to refute the allegations brought against Jackson in the 'Leaving Neverland' documentary.

Singer Michael Jackson waves to supporters as he arrives at the Santa Barbara County Courthouse
Christina Barany / Getty Images

A new documentary seeks to refute the allegations brought against Jackson in the 'Leaving Neverland' documentary.

As a response to the Leaving Neverland documentary, devoted fans of Michael Jackson have countered with their own documentary that’s set to broadcast on Amazon Prime Video in June, reports The Sun.

The film seeks to expose the contradictions and inconsistencies they see in the claims of Wade Robson and James Safechuck who allege they were sexually abused by Jackson.

A television source told The Sun that footage will question many of the details from Robson and Safechuck’s accounts.

“Its makers claim some of their stories would have been impossible, mainly because there were so many people close to Michael and surely they would have ­witnessed such behavior.”

The documentary will highlight the accounts of former child star and close friend Mark Lester, bodyguard Matt Fiddes, and Jackson biographer Mike Smallcombe, who said Safechuck’s’ allegation of experiencing abuse in Neverland’s train station is not true because it was erected two years after he claimed the abuse had stopped.

Lester told The Sun that Jackson was “just naive” and would never abuse children.

Lester, who became famous at 8-years-old as the star of the 1968 movie Oliver!, said he was disgusted upon hearing the allegations. He described doing research and being distressed by the information he found. He was particularly upset by what was being brought into the public domain, which he expressed as being unnecessary.

“I’ve never met these two guys but from what I can gather, whether it’s true or not, I understand that they had both sworn previously on oath that Michael had done nothing of the sort.”

Lester stressed that the man described in the documentary was not the man he knew, claiming that he never witnessed anything inappropriate. He said he only saw children “having the time of their lives” at the gargantuan ranch.

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He noted he had not seen the documentary and had no desire to, adding that he believed the entire motivation behind it was to “dish up dirt.”

As Jackson’s bodyguard of 10 years, Fiddes also disputed the allegations, saying it was physically impossible to get past Neverland’s security systems. He said with nannies and cameras above the bedroom doors, hundreds of people would have had to turn a blind eye.

Fiddes also mentioned that as bodyguards, he and his brother-in-law would stand outside Jackson’s bedroom door, and never heard anything untoward going on.

The release of Leaving Neverland in January has had a domino effect on the late musician’s career, causing radio stations to yank Jackson’s music from rotation and Oprah Winfrey to publicly support his accusers.