Donald Trump ‘Pee Tape’ May Have Been Known In Moscow Months Before ‘Steele Dossier’ Alleged Tape’s Existence

The possible existence of compromising tapes of Donald Trump from his 2013 Russia trip was the topic of conversation at Moscow parties in 2016, says a businessman mentioned in the Mueller Report.

Donald Trump points.
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The possible existence of compromising tapes of Donald Trump from his 2013 Russia trip was the topic of conversation at Moscow parties in 2016, says a businessman mentioned in the Mueller Report.

“Compromising” tapes of Donald Trump from his 2013 trip to Moscow — tapes that could include the infamous, rumored “pee tape” — were openly discussed at a Moscow social gathering more than two months before the alleged existence of such tapes was made public in the “Steele Dossier.” According to an interview with Bloomberg News, this claim comes from a Russia-linked businessman, Giorgi Rtskhiladze, who appears in the Mueller Report.

The controversial “dossier” was compiled by former British intelligence agent and Russia expert Christopher Steele, and while Steele intended the compilation of intelligence reports to remain private, they were obtained and posted online by BuzzFeed News on January 10, 2017, 10 days before Trump’s inauguration.

But as The Inquisitr reported, Special Counsel Robert Mueller wrote in his report of findings in the Russia investigation, that it was on October 30, 2016 — nine days before the 2016 presidential election — that Trump’s then-lawyer and “fixer” Michael Cohen received a text message from businessman Giorgi Rtskhiladze, warning Cohen of “compromising tapes of Trump,” recorded during his visit to Moscow with the Miss Universe beauty pageant, which Trump owned at the time.

According to the Mueller Report, accessible online via The New York Times, Rtskhiladze told Cohen that he had “Stopped flow of tapes from Russia…. Just so you know.”

Giorgi Rtskhiladze smiles.
Russia-linked businessman Giorgi Rtskhiladze, who told Michael Cohen about ‘tapes’ from Donald Trump’s 2013 Moscow trip. Chance Yeh / Getty Images

The businessman told Bloomberg in the interview that “he was only communicating a rumor a friend had overheard at a Moscow party.” The friend called him to alert him about the rumored tapes because Rtskhiladze had been involved in business deals with Trump, the businessman claimed. But where the “rumors” originated and why the rumors of the tapes had spread so widely that they were casually discussed at Moscow parties are questions that remain unanswered by Rtskhiladze’s Bloomberg interview.

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But Rtskhiladze now says that Mueller characterized the text exchange with Cohen incorrectly, and demands a retraction, according to Bloomberg. He said that his text actually read “Stopped flow of some tapes from Russia,” contending through a lawyer that the inclusion of the word “some” proves that “Mr. Rtskhiladze had no knowledge of the tapes’ content,” according to an account by The Hill.

Why the single word “some” indicates anything about Rtskhiladze’s knowledge of the tapes’ content remains unclear, though the lawyer’s letter to Attorney General William Barr claims that the remainder of the text exchange, not included by Mueller in his report, also supports the contention that Rtskhiladze did not know what the tapes supposedly contained.

The Steele Dossier alleged, as The Inquisitr has reported, that during his 2013 brief Moscow stay, Trump hired Russian prostitutes to perform a “golden showers” urination show for him in a suite at the Moscow Ritz-Carlton Hotel — an incident that was secretly recorded by Russian intelligence operatives. The dossier also says that Russian intelligence had collected “embarrassing material” on Trump’s “unorthodox behavior” during Trump’s previous visits to Russia.