Hacker Who Used Skills To Spread Gripes About Phillies Management Almost Dies In His Own Terrifying Home

A snake.
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Allan Carlson, 55, was previously arrested for white supremacist vandalism in California and served prison time for an email hacking scheme targeting Philadelphia newspapers, which was driven by a relentless anger about what he saw as the mismanagement of the Philadelphia Phillies. But it was his near death from a snake bite that occurred in his own bizarre and terrifying home that brought Carlson to headlines most recently, per New Jersey.

Carlson nearly died when he was bitten by his pet cobra in September. After he was driven to the hospital by his mother, who claimed the bite occurred elsewhere, an officer reported to Carlson’s home to investigate. Upon searching the home, officers found dozens of containers holding bugs and snakes. As many as 30 tarantulas were there as well, plus a number of plastic containers with their lids weighed down. One door was shut tight with bricks and weights barring entry, according to reports.

Carlson’s mother indicated that she did not think any of the animals were poisonous and that the barricaded room was where the snakes were fed.

Officers returned to the home later with a warrant and searched the premises. Behind the barricaded door, they found, to their horror, two uncaged reticulated pythons, with one measuring over 10 feet long. Also loose in the room was an African forest cobra, which the police believed to be the one that bit Carlson in the first place. Each was captured and additional snakes were also removed. Only one was not venomous.

The snakes were relocated to the Cape May County Zoo and will ultimately end up at a research facility in Kentucky.

Carlson was charged with possessing exotic wildlife without a permit and 15 counts of possessing a potentially dangerous exotic animal without a permit, according to a spokesperson from the Department of Environmental Protection. He was ultimately fined $5,000.

Despite the bizarre nature of the charges against Carlson, this particular incident is not necessarily even the most interesting in his criminal history. In 1993, he was arrested for stamping “earth’s most endangered species: the white race, help preserve it” in more than 30 notebooks at a grocery store.

In 2005, Carlson was sentenced to four years in prison for hacking the email accounts of writers at a number of Philadelphia news outlets, which he used to spread his personal complaints about the management of the Philadelphia Phillies baseball team and their alleged unwillingness to fund a proper winning team.

The newspapers reported about $25,000 in costs associated with the meddling.