Consuming More Than Two Sodas A Day Linked To Higher Risk Of Premature Death, Especially Among Women

Soda drinking habits have been linked to a higher risk of an early death through cardiovascular disease, particularly among females.

A girl drinks a bottle of soda.
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Soda drinking habits have been linked to a higher risk of an early death through cardiovascular disease, particularly among females.

Everyone has their go-to pick me up they turn to for a little boost throughout the day. For many, it’s a cup of coffee in the morning and maybe a second when they hit that mid-morning wall. For others, soda or sports drinks are a part of their regular routine. It’s well known that heavy soda consumption can lead to weight gain, tooth decay, and overall poor health, but now researchers are saying that the sugary beverages are linked to premature death. Many might think they’re cutting back by switching to diet, but in reality, diet sodas can have just as many detrimental side effects, according to Market Watch.

Previous studies have noticed a correlation to heavy soda consumption and health issues, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Other reports found that drinking diet sodas on a daily basis can shrink overall brain volume and even cause dementia later in life. If these findings weren’t already enough to encourage heavy soda drinkers to kick the habit, new studies show that excessive soda consumption can actually be deadly, and women are particularly at risk.

A new report by the American Heart Association and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health examined the lifespan of both male and female subjects coupled with contributing factors such as exercise, BMI, and diet. The results were staggering. Those who drank more than two sodas or other sugary beverages a day faced a shocking 31 percent increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. When dividing the test subjects up by gender, it was determined that women who consume more than two servings of soda a day are looking at a 63 percent increase of risk of an early death. Meanwhile, men faced a 29 percent increase in risk.

Vasanti Malik, lead author of the study, warned readers that if they want to have the best chance at a long and healthy life, they have to put the soda down. Diet sodas may lower the daily sugar intake, but the healthiest and smartest option is just plain old water.

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“Drinking water in place of sugary drinks is a healthy choice that could contribute to longevity. Diet soda may be used to help frequent consumers of sugary drinks cut back their consumption, but water is the best and healthiest choice.”

People seem to be catching on to the deadly side effects soda can yield, with sales of these beverages reaching the lowest they’ve been in decades, as of 2016.