Netflix Shuts Down Fans Upset About The Edited Ending Of ‘The Notebook’

A view of the signage and branding at the Netflix Dear White People S1, premiere LA screening 2017 on April 27, 2017 in Los Angeles, California.
Jonathan Leibson / Getty Images

In a follow up to a previous The Inquisitr report, Netflix has responded to fans’ outrage about the ending of a beloved movie, The Notebook, thought to have been edited for a more ambiguous or happier outcome. Netflix, using their Twitter account, in their trademark snarky and hilarious way, notified fans what happened, as well as reassuring them that the original ending would be intact when it comes to the American version of the film.

The earlier report saw fans outraged by the alternate ending of The Notebook, recounting their rage, tears and overall dissatisfaction with Netflix. The film featured an elderly couple, with the wife (Gena Rowlands) suffering from Alzheimer’s and unable to remember her own husband (James Garner). He patiently recounted their love story to her through flashbacks. The movie ends with the wife finally remembering her husband, only for both to die in each others’ arms.

The general assumption was that Netflix, somehow, had changed the ending of the Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams film, to maybe make it more palatable to audiences, instead of the tragic ending implied at the end of the original film. The outrage was pretty swift, with many wondering what prompted the change. Accusations of softening the ending swirled as well.

The outcry was all over social media, however, at the time of the original report, no official statement from Netflix had been made. That promptly changed.

In another recent report by The Inquisitr, the Netflix original, Bird Box, also required a minor edit of footage of a real-life fatal accident, after the outcry from the public. In that case, the film was an original movie produced by Netflix, therefore the choice of removing or altering scenes are well within their purview. With The Notebook, however, the alternate version of the film seems to have been supplied to the streaming giant.

While the change had sparked a lot of debate, Netflix’s tweet clarified the situation, albeit in a snarky way that may not have been appreciated by many. Netflix U.K. clarified that they did not edit the film, but instead was provided an alternate version. They promptly corrected the issue (while still making light) and ensured that the original ending of The Notebook was on Netflix going forward.

Actors Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams winners of Best Kiss for 'The Notebook' pose backstage during the 2005 MTV Movie Awards at the Shrine Auditorium on June 4, 2005 in Los Angeles, California.
Actors Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams winners of Best Kiss for ‘The Notebook’ pose backstage during the 2005 MTV Movie Awards at the Shrine Auditorium on June 4, 2005 in Los Angeles, California. Frederick M. Brown / Getty Images
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Netflix’s social media accounts are one of the world’s best when it comes to engaging audiences in creative, innovative, and thoughtful ways. However, admitting to a mistake, while not their fault, in a sarcastic manner may not have helped the situation. Despite this, Netflix went on to reassure its members that they will be able to enjoy the original version, in all its tearful glory.

The Notebook is now streaming on Netflix.