Advertisers Jumping Ship From Tucker Carlson’s Show Following Controversial Remarks

Tucker Carlson speaks onstage during Politicon 2018
Rich Polk / Getty Images for Politicon

Fox News talk show host Tucker Carlson was already looking a little low on advertisers for his television slot Tucker Carlson Tonight, but this latest round of controversy is only going to make that worse.

Over the weekend, recordings surfaced of Carlson from his frequent radio call-ins from 2006 to 2009. During the calls, he, among other things, defended a convicted pedophile, compared Martha Stewart’s daughter to a crude name for female anatomy, made racist remarks about Afghans by comparing them to “semi-literate, primitive monkeys,” degraded sex workers, and defended female-on-male statutory rape.

Unsurprisingly, a number of Carlson’s remaining advertisers are announcing that they won’t be sticking around during the fallout of these latest remarks. According to NBC News, pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, bedding firm Sheex, and Outback Steakhouse have said they will no longer be associated with Carlson’s show.

“AstraZeneca can confirm we are no longer advertising on the Tucker Carlson show and we will not be advertising on this program in the future,” the company said in a statement.

So far, MyPillow and Claritin-D have remained on the show, both appearing to advertise during Carlson’s Monday night segment.

Carlson’s show originally lost 14 advertisers in December after the host said that immigrants “make America poorer and dirtier and more divided.”

Despite the controversy, the skedaddling advertisers, and the thousands of calls over Twitter for Carlson to be sacked, Fox News has said that they will continue to support him throughout.

“Fox News is behind us, as they have been since the very first day. Toughness is a rare quality in a TV network, and we are grateful for that.”

Carlson has also refused to apologize for any of the comments.

“Media Matters caught me saying something naughty on a radio show more than a decade ago. Rather than express the usual ritual contrition, how about this: I’m on television every weeknight live for an hour. If you want to know what I think, you can watch. Anyone who disagrees with my views is welcome to come on and explain why,” Carlson posted to Twitter.

He further explained his views on issuing an apology for his remarks, implying that it would constitute “bowing to the mob” and that “we’ve always apologized when we’re wrong,” indicating that despite the horrific nature of the comments, Carlson doesn’t actually feel he’s done anything worth apologizing for.

As Vox, points out, it’s also rather ironic that Carlson doesn’t feel he should be held accountable for comments he made a decade ago, despite the fact that he regularly — and as recently as last Friday — jumps on Democrats for things they said many years ago.