Bernie Sanders Won’t Be Asking For Hillary Clinton’s Campaign Advice, Says They Have ‘Fundamental Differences’

While Bernie Sanders has said that he respects Hillary Clinton's role in American politics, the presidential hopeful will not be seeking her advice.

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) addresses the crowd during the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day at the Dome event on January 21, 2019 in Columbia, South Carolina.
Sean Rayford / Getty Images

While Bernie Sanders has said that he respects Hillary Clinton's role in American politics, the presidential hopeful will not be seeking her advice.

While preparing to run for president in 2020, one thing that Senator Bernie Sanders will apparently not be doing is asking for any campaign advice from Hillary Clinton, citing “fundamental differences” in their beliefs and approach to politics.

As Fox News reports, when Sanders appeared on ABC News’ The View on Friday, Meghan McCain asked the Vermont senator whether Clinton might have any useful words of advice for his campaign, citing other hopefuls who had also gone to her for advice. As Bernie succinctly replied, “I suspect not. She has not called me.”

While Bernie Sanders admitted that he respected Hillary, he nevertheless explained that there were just too many differences between them.

“We have differences, you know, Hillary has played a very important role in modern American politics.”

When McCain sought to clarify what Sanders had said, asking him one more time whether he would be approaching Hillary Clinton to discuss his 2020 campaign, Bernie was adamant that he would not.

However, he did say that the single most important thing in the upcoming election is ensuring that Donald Trump is soundly defeated, and that if his campaign does not succeed, he will still support whoever is up against the current president.

“I think every Democrat is gonna come together. I hope to be the Democratic nominee and have the support of the whole Democratic Party behind me. If I am not, and somebody else is, I will support that candidate because what’s most important is that Trump be defeated. Hillary and I have fundamental differences.”

When Hillary Clinton won the 2016 presidential primary, she had 16 million votes, but Bernie Sanders had 12 million. With many believing that he was railroaded by the DNC, with only a 4-million vote difference between the pair three years ago, there is a very high probability that Sanders may get the necessary votes this time around to run for president, something which he was not able to do before.

Clinton, it should be noted, wrote a scathing assessment of Bernie Sanders in her memoir What Happened, claiming that Sanders’ words had created “lasting damage” which ultimately helped Donald Trump to win after Democrats failed to unite and side with her against Trump.

While speaking on The View, Sanders also explained that his 2020 campaign will be markedly different from the one in 2016, and that he will make certain that this time he leads all of the left in America against what he claims are the numerous and “powerful special interests that today have so much economic and political power.”

With Bernie Sanders not taking any advice from Hillary Clinton, the presidential hopeful has said that his campaign is one that will be firmly grassroots in tradition, and that he will be bringing people together rather than dividing them, something which he believes will be a marked change from the tactics of Trump.