‘Vaccines Cause Adults,’ New York Pediatric Facility Declares Amid Measles Outbreak

Doctor vaccinating young child in the hospital
Africa Studio / Shutterstock

In response to the anti-vaxxer slogan “vaccines cause autism,” staff at Legacy Pediatrics in Rochester, New York, are plastering a slogan of their own all across social media.

“Vaccines cause adults,” the rebuttal slogan reads.

Roughly two weeks ago, the New York pediatric facility took to Facebook to share a photo of several members of their staff rocking solid black T-shirts featuring their new slogan.

In the comments of the Facebook post, the facility reveals the company that made the T-shirt – CrazyDogTshirts – now sells the shirts on their website with proceeds going toward local pediatric hospitals and the UNICEF vaccination fund.

With just shy of 1,500 reactions since the time the photo was shared on Facebook, the reactions are pretty mixed with nearly 500 angry faces, just over 400 likes, nearly 300 loves, over 200 laughs, 50 sad, and only 10 surprised.

According to USA Today, the staff of the pediatric facility decided to have the T-shirts made and share the photo on social media after feeling “disturbed” by the recent measles outbreaks across the U.S.

Dr. Janet Casey of Legacy Pediatrics acknowledges how difficult – but important – it is to get a more positive message about vaccines out to the world.

“We have to be as loud and as emphatic as the anti-vaxxers and unfortunately it’s not very sexy or headline-grabbing to say that vaccinations are safe and effective. I’m real proud of us,” Casey continued to explain.

Casey told USA Today it was a member of her staff that spotted a meme featuring “vaccines cause adults” before speaking with a friend who offered to print t-shirts with the slogan for free. When the pediatric facility posted the photo on Facebook, it didn’t take long before many wanted to know where they could go to buy a similar shirt.

Unsurprisingly, the photo also drew in an anti-vaxxer crowd who proceeded to blast vaccinations as a “pharmaceutical scam” and the root of a wealth of illnesses.

With a mixture of those both for and against vaccinations, the photo has accumulated over 3,600 comments.

“Do these ladies know what is in a vaccine? What are the side effects the risks? Have they heard of Dr Zimmerman? Do they know what informed consent is? What VAERS is? Vaccines cause SIDS, autism, ADHD, seizures, autoimmune disease, allergies, asthma. Do they know vaccines shed,” one individual penned in a comment on the Facebook post.

A second Facebook user chimed in. “Thank you for supporting evidence-based pediatric care. Vaccines are scientifically proven to be safe and to save lives. Good parents appreciate science-based care for their children.”

The anti-vaxxer slogan “vaccines cause autism” continues to gain momentum despite the CDC insisting there is no link between the spectrum disorder and vaccinations.

Still speaking to USA Today, Dr. Janet Casey remains optimistic as people who are pro-vaccination continue to speak out during the recent measles outbreak. The doctor admitted to previously fearing it would take hundreds of people to die from a preventable disease for the world to grasp the importance of vaccinations.