Donald Trump Reportedly Working On New Nicknames For Democratic Presidential Candidates

'Pocahontas' and 'Crazy Bernie' are passé, it seems.

President Donald Trump speaks during a rally at Florida International University.
Joe Raedle / Getty Images

'Pocahontas' and 'Crazy Bernie' are passé, it seems.

On February 19, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders announced via Twitter that he is running for president of the United States.

It did not take long for Donald Trump to weigh in. “Personally I think he missed his time,” the president told the press, as previously reported by the Inquisitr, injecting himself in the national conversation once again.

Trump praised and insulted Sanders, claiming that he agrees with the senator’s trade policies, but adding that his own solutions are better. The president also reminded the auditorium of scandalous Democratic primaries and the power battles between Hillary Clinton’s wing of the Democratic Party and Sanders’ constituency.

Trump’s strategy differs from that of his predecessors: He is looking to become part of the Democratic primary, observing the show from a distance and sowing discord, according to a new report from the Associated Press.

The news agency talked to a number of current and former White House officials, offering a glimpse into behind the scenes happenings at the highest office in the land. According to aides, Trump is not only looking to sow discord and position himself in the opposition party debate, the president is developing new nicknames for each and every one of his potential 2020 opponents.

Trump has been brainstorming, looking for vulnerabilities, and coming up with new ways to insult, degrade, and label Democratic presidential candidates. Nicknames he coined, like “Pocahontas for Elizabeth Warren and “Crazy Bernie” for Bernie Sanders, are apparently passé: The president is eager to make his voice heard.

“The president has an ability to use social media to define his opponents and influence the primary debate in a way no sitting president before him has. I expect him to take full advantage,” former White House spokesman Raj Shah explained for the AP.

Donald Trump’s campaign manager Brad Parscale added that the commander-in-chief is looking to “define his potential opponent and impact the Democrat primary debate.”

But this is not a new strategy for Trump. Not only had the president infamously fought his way through Republican debates with insults, labels, and trademark nicknames, the practice has continued throughout the presidency. Most recently, as the AP notes, Trump took to social media to mock, ridicule, and insult a number of his potential 2020 opponents.

“If Elizabeth Warren, often referred to by me as Pocahontas, did this commercial from Bighorn or Wounded Knee instead of her kitchen, with her husband dressed in full Indian garb, it would have been a smash!” Trump commented on one of Elizabeth Warren’s Instagram videos.

Beto O’Rourke and Amy Klobuchar have both found themselves on the president’s radar — he capitalized on the chance to mock O’Rourke’s crowd size and Klobuchar’s announcement speech.