Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Says Her DC Office Is ‘Flooded With Bigoted Calls’

U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) (R) is followed by members of the media after she watched two votes at the Senate chamber January 24, 2019 at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC.
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Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez tweeted on Friday that her office is being “flooded with bigoted calls” that are making it difficult to hear the needs of her actual constituents. The freshman congresswoman from New York was weighing in on a conversation between colleagues who said that they frequently receive offensive and “hateful” voicemails.

Lee Zeldin, a Jewish Congressman from New York, posted a copy of a voicemail on Twitter in which a man attacks Jewish people and calls Jews “worse than Hitler.” The caller says that people like Zeldin are “maggots” and “nothing but animals.”

Ilhan Omar, a refugee and Minnesota Congresswoman, who is the first Somali-American to serve in Congress responded, saying that she also receives offensive phone calls.

“This is heinous and hateful. I too am flooded with bigoted voicemails and calls every day. Maybe we could meet and share notes on how to fight religious discrimination of all kinds?” she wrote on Twitter.

Ocasio-Cortez joined in the conversation, saying that her office is also “flooded” with calls. She added that she sends the threats to the police.

“Yep. Our offices are flooded with bigoted calls too — so much so that we have to put energy into searching for actual constituents,” she wrote. “We forward all the threats to Capitol Police to build files. For all those who think your bigoted calls + digital threats are anonymous: Enjoy!”

Ocasio-Cortez recently faced her own accusations of anti-semitism when she gave an address at the third annual Women’s March in New York in January. One of the march’s organizers, Tamika Mallory, refused to condemn Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, who has a long history of making anti-Semitic statements.

Several lawmakers stepped away from the march, including Florida Democrat Debbie Wasserman Schultz. But Ocasio-Cortez chose to make an appearance at the march despite concerns. Other leaders, like Kirsten Gillibrand, supported the broader goal of the march, but distanced themselves from any hint of anti-Semitism.

Ocasio-Cortez said that she believes that concerns about anti-Semitism within the Trump administration are valid and that people need to protect those in the Jewish community who feel threatened.

Also on Friday, the New York Democrat lashed out at the proposal to build an Amazon headquarters in New York City.

Ocasio-Cortez has been critical of Amazon, saying that the company has a record of questionable hiring practices and relatively low pay.

In November, the progressive star headlined a meeting of activists fighting against the new headquarters.