Tax Porn To Pay For The Wall? Arizona Politician Proposes Porn Fee

Activist behind legislation once sued for the right to marry his laptop computer; experts say proposed law is likely unconstitutional.

Fans of porn stars like Stormy Daniels may face a tax in Arizona
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Activist behind legislation once sued for the right to marry his laptop computer; experts say proposed law is likely unconstitutional.

As the government remains shut down over the president’s demands for a border wall and the Congressional Democrats’ refusal to go along with them, one politician in Arizona’s state legislature has a novel proposal for funding border security.

Rep. Gail Griffin, a Republican in Arizona’s state House, has introduced legislation, called HB 2444.to force users of pornography to fund border security.

How will it work? Per the Arizona Mirror, the legislation would require distributors of electronic devices to install blocking software on all Internet-accessible devices. Owners of the devices could then pay $20 in order to remove the software.

Similar schemes have been proposed in other states, although not in relation to building a wall.

That money would go towards border security, through the creation of a “John McCain Human Trafficking and Child Exploitation Fund,” which would allocate it for several things, including “build a border wall between Mexico and this state or fund border security,” “physical and mental health services,” housing placements, money for schools, and to “prevent and protect victims of human trafficking, domestic violence, prostitution, divorce, child abuse and sexual assault.”

While the fund is named for John McCain, the late Senator who represented Arizona, it’s not clear if McCain’s family has expressed support for the legislation. The laws in other states have often been positioned as preventing human trafficking.

An activist and prankster named Chris Sevier is one of the major supporters behind the legislation, per the Mirror. Last year he was asked by abduction survivor Elizabeth Smart to remove her name from a similar piece of legislation that was introduced in Rhode Island.

Sevier, in 2017, pulled a stunt in which he attempted to marry his laptop computer, as a protest against legalized same-sex marriage.

Mike Stabile, a spokesman for the Free Speech Coalition, told the Mirror that the Arizona legislation is “pretty clearly unconstitutional. The ACLU has also raised similar objections against past attempts to pass such laws at the state level, AL.com reported.

It’s also somewhat unrealistic to expect any large member of Arizona residents to, effectively, register with the state in order to watch porn. The $20 fee, even spread across Arizona’s population, is arguably a bit modest for the long list of legislative priorities that are listed in the bill.

Furthermore, there’s a good chance that the “distributors” of electronic devices, whether on the hardware side or Internet service providers, would react to such legislation by threatening to no longer do business in Arizona, rather than subject themselves and their customers to such a regime.