Pope Francis Launches A ‘Click To Pray’ App To Remind You To Give Thanks

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Pope Francis wants to get people back to regular prayer, and what better way to do it than a digital reminder on your phone. The pope, 82, wants to bring a new generation on board with daily prayer, and is launching an app for you phone and tablet.

The Daily Beast says that the app that Pope Francis is supporting is called “Click to Pray,” and he launched it today during his Sunday service during his angelus prayer from his window overlooking St. Peter’s Square in Rome.

In an effort to click with a younger audience, the pope’s app launch coincides with the Catholic Church’s World Youth Day 2019 which kicks off in Panama on January 22. To appeal to an even younger audience, Pope Francis is reaching out to kids through the Eucharistic Youth Movement, or EYM.

The app will allow people to simply remember to pray or even “Pray with the Pope” in Spanish, English, Italian, French, Portuguese, or German. Additionally, there are two more options, “Pray every day,” which sends users notifications three times a day to get down and pray, and “Pray with the network,” which is a multi-user platform where registered participants can connect with others, including Pope Francis, whose handle is simply Pope Francis, of course.

But while Pope Francis is taking his new app on the road to meet the prayer needs of youth, he might have bigger problems to take care of in a meeting in February regarding his protege, Argentine Bishop Gustavo Zanchetta, says the Inquisitr.

Zanchetta had a history of questionable behavior before he made the move from Argentina to the Vatican. Vicar Juan Jose Manzano, of the bishop’s home diocese, wrote a detailed letter to Rome which said that Zanchetta sent seminarians nude selfies and sexually harassed them. As evidence, the vicar sent a copy of the photo to the Vatican to prove the allegations.

“In 2015, we just sent a ‘digital support’ with selfie photos of the previous bishop in obscene or out of place behavior that seemed inappropriate and dangerous. It was an alarm that we made to the Holy See via some friendly bishops. The nunciature didn’t intervene directly, but the Holy Father summoned Zanchetta and he justified himself saying that his cellphone had been hacked and that there were people who were out to damage the image of the pope.”

But despite concerns raised by his own parish, Zanchetta was soon offered a promotion with a move to Rome. This matter and others are going to be discussed in a conference which will take place in Rome at the end of February.