Theresa May Says U.K. Faces ‘Uncharted Territory’ If MPs Vote Against Her Brexit Deal

British Prime Minister Theresa May at Downing Street.
Niklas Halle’n – WPA Pool / Getty Images

British Prime Minister Theresa May has warned MPs that the country risks facing “uncharted territory” if Parliament votes against her Brexit deal.

The United Kingdom’s due date to leave the European Union is March 29, 2019, but if MPs refuse to back the deal in next week’s vote, the country may be “in danger,” she claimed. May has reached an exit deal with the E.U., but it needs approval from Members of Parliament in order to be officially implemented. MPs are expected to be asked to vote on either January 14 or 15.

“If the deal is not voted on, then we are going to be in uncharted territory,” the British PM said, as reported by the BBC.

“I don’t think anyone can say what will happen in terms of the reaction we see in Parliament.”

But while May promised new measures to further protect Northern Ireland, as well as more power for her MPs when it comes to future Brexit negotiations, one Conservative politician claimed that support for a no-deal Brexit was “hardening,” while one senior Labour member admitted she thought a general election may happen in the near future if the Prime Minister can’t gather enough support for her deal in Parliament.

“What you have is a Labour leadership… which is opposing any deal to create the greatest chaos possible, people who are promoting a second referendum in order to stop Brexit and people who want to see their perfect Brexit… the danger there is we end up with no Brexit at all,” Theresa May said.

Anti-Brexit protesters demonstrate outside parliament
The Brexit vote in Parliament was postponed in December as Theresa May faced an overwhelming defeat. Christopher Furlong / Getty Images

The vote was supposed to have happened last December, but it was postponed as May was expected to face an overwhelming defeat. When asked if the vote would “definitely” take place next week by the BBC’s Andrew Marr, the British PM assured the country that it will go ahead.

“Yes, we are going to hold the vote,” she detailed.

She once again stood by the agreement she reached with the E.U., saying it was a “good deal” for the U.K. May also stated that some changes had been implemented since last month, which she would discuss in more detail in the coming days — particularly regarding new safeguards for Northern Ireland and more power for Parliament members in future E.U. negotiations. When asked if she was willing to quit the role of Prime Minister, May stated she was focused on delivering the best Brexit deal, as her party had made it clear she was the right person to do so.