Trump Impeachment Is ‘Inescapable,’ Watergate Journalist Elizabeth Drew Says

President Donald Trump holds up his right hand while speaking to the media.
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A prominent journalist during the Watergate era of American politics penned an op-ed detailing how President Donald Trump could come to be impeached in the future, detailing her belief that it’s not only a possibility, but an inevitability at this point.

“An impeachment process against President Trump now seems inescapable,” Elizabeth Drew wrote in her New York Times op-ed published on Thursday. “Unless the president resigns, the pressure by the public on the Democratic leaders to begin an impeachment process next year will only increase.”

Drew explained in her op-ed that there already exists enough evidence to impeach Trump as it stands right now. But beyond what the public already knows, Russia investigation special counsel Robert Mueller knows much more.

“We will learn what [Mueller] has found, even if his investigation is cut short,” Drew predicted.

While many may counter her insight as flawed, given that a Republican majority still exists in the U.S. Senate that can insulate Trump from indictment following impeachment, Drew insisted that Trump isn’t as protected as some may believe he is. Trump’s unpopularity began when he ran for president, and continues now as made unpopular decisions in recent weeks, including withdrawing troops from Syria, backing leaders in Saudi Arabia after an apparent assassination against a dissenting journalist, and the removal of James Mattis as Secretary of Defense.

“A significant number of Republican candidates didn’t want to run with Mr. Trump in the midterms, and the results of those elections didn’t exactly strengthen his standing within his party. His political status, weak for some time, is now hurtling downhill” in light of these recent events, Drew wrote.

Things are going to get worse for Trump, among members of his own party, Drew added.

“The current situation, already shifting, will have been left far behind by the time the senators face that question,” Drew said.

In short, Republican support for Trump is waning, especially in the Senate where it counts the most. Trump will eventually be forced into making a decision — resigning from office in order to escape possible impeachment before the process can begin, or risk trying to win a political battle in Congress that Drew believes is becoming more likely for him to lose as time goes on.

Per previous reporting from the Inquisitr, Trump is not only losing the battle for winning minds in the Senate, but he’s also losing the public opinion battle as well. While many polls demonstrate it’s much too soon for impeachment at this present time, an Associated Press/NORC poll conducted earlier this month found that, if clear wrongdoing by the president is discovered by Mueller (including obstruction of justice), Congress should move to impeach the president.

A clear majority in that poll, 51 percent of Americans, said that impeachment absolutely should be utilized against Trump if it’s found he committed a crime.