Trial Begins Against Mohiussunnath Chowdhury In Relation To Alleged Terror Attack Outside Buckingham Palace

Mohiussunnath Chowdhury is believed to have charged police outside Buckingham Palace and wrote a note in which he claimed Queen Elizabeth would 'be in the hellfire.'

Police teams secure the roads behind a cordoned area following an apparent attack on two police officers at Buckingham Palace on August 25, 2017 in London, England
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Mohiussunnath Chowdhury is believed to have charged police outside Buckingham Palace and wrote a note in which he claimed Queen Elizabeth would 'be in the hellfire.'

Court proceedings have been heard in relation to Mohiussunnath Chowdhury, 27, an Uber driver who allegedly drove at police outside Buckingham Palace and then tried to attack them on August 25, 2017.

According to the Sun, around 8:30 p.m. on August 25, Chowdhury swerved through cones outside Buckingham Palace, aiming for police that was coming out of a van at the time. Jurors were then told that the man ran at the police, brandishing a samurai sword and shouting, “Allahu Akbar.” However, police were able to wrestle Chowdhury to the ground and arrest him.

“It was due to the bravery and quick reaction of these uniformed police officers that something even more serious did not happen,” Prosecutor Timothy Cray said in court.

“As the police officers got to the car the defendant said to them words to the effect, ‘it’s all a bit f**ked up’. They then saw him reach for the sword, the officers were struggling with him, getting the passenger door open, reaching into the driver’s door to stop him using the sword.”

A “short but fairly desperate struggle” then ensured before Chowdhury was subdued. During this time, PC Midgley sustained a cut to his hand.

According to the court case, Chowdhury is denying the charge of “engaging in conduct in preparation of terrorist acts.” However, jurors heard of how Chowdhury admitted the events and claimed that police do “the dirty work of the UK government.” In addition to this, police were able to secure Chowdhury’s internet browser history as well as damning evidence on his WhatsApp chats that allegedly revealed his support for Islamist terrorism.

In addition to the alleged attack, Chowdhury, a British national, also wrote a “martyrdom note” approximately three hours prior to the attack outside Buckingham Palace, some of which was read during the court proceedings.

“Tell everyone that I love them and that they should struggle against the enemies of Allah with their lives and property. The Queen and her soldiers will all be in the hellfire. They go to war with Muslims around the world and kill them without any mercy. They are the enemies that Allah tells us to fight.”

“He stated in clear terms that his intention was to get to paradise by becoming a martyr, fighting in his words ‘the enemies of Allah.,'” Cray also said during the proceedings.

Thirty minutes prior to writing the note, Chowdhury also bought a “sharpening tool” from a Sainsbury’s. Jurors heard that this was used to sharpen the samurai sword used in the alleged attack.

The trial continues in London at the Old Bailey.