Poll Shows Voters Feel Donald Trump Uses Twitter Too Much

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U.S. President Donald Trump has made himself known as the “tweeting president,” with most of his “official” statements made over the social media site Twitter. He also uses the platform to rant at everything and everyone he disagrees with and to bully people he has taken a dislike to.

But now polls seem to show that people would prefer it if the president were to find a different — and more presidential — way to communicate his thoughts, according to the Hill.

A Morning Consult survey found that both Democratic and Republican voters have had enough of the tweeting.

“There are few things that Democrats and Republicans agree on these days, but one thing we found in a May survey earlier this year with Politico was that 72 percent of all voters agreed that the president uses Twitter too much,” Cameron Easley said on Monday.

“That includes a majority of Republicans. And asked whether it was mainly a good thing or a bad thing in the way he used Twitter, 62 percent said it was mainly a bad thing. Now, Republicans were a little bit more lenient on that front — they were split 38 percent for or against whether it was a good or a bad thing.”

Easley pointed out that that figure is quite a large split among Republican voters who are usually in agreement about major things relating to Trump and his administration.

President Donald Trump addresses the Project Safe Neighborhoods National Conference
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A more specific survey conducted by Hill TV shows that around 37 percent of voters believe that the president’s excessive and erratic tweeting has a negative impact on the stock market.

One evident example came just last week, when Trump tweeted that he could raise tariffs on China if the communist nation did not agree to revamp its trade practices with the U.S. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down almost 800 points and the S&P 500 dropped more than 3 percent following the tweets.

“The stock market does not like uncertainty, and the president’s Twitter feed is nothing but uncertainty,” political analyst Bill Schneider said.

Schneider added on Monday that the uncertainty that comes with the tweeting president is not good for the market at all, saying that every morning “it’s uncertain whether he’s going to attack China, or if he’s going to make peace with China. Whether he’s going to embrace [Russian President Vladimir] Putin, or whether he’s going to go after Putin. The stock market doesn’t like that.”

The remainder of the poll’s results showed that 21 percent believe his tweets have no effect on the stock market, 19 percent think they have a mostly negative effect with some positive impact, 13 percent think it’s mostly positive with some negative impact, and nine percent say they believe it’s only positive.