Blind Man Sues ‘Playboy’ Website Because He Is Unable To Read The Articles, Violating US Disability Law

Playboy Enterprises, Inc. is an American privately held global media and lifestyle company, one of the most widely recognized and popular brands in the world
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A legally blind man recently sued Playboy’s websites, alleging that the online publications are not set up in such a way that would allow the blind and visually impaired to access their content.

As first reported by TMZ, Donald Nixon claimed in his lawsuit against Playboy.com and Playboyshop.com that neither website works with the screen-reading software he uses to read online articles, thus making them in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The publication cited legal documents filed by Nixon, which state that the two Playboy websites do not allow visually impaired individuals to “fully and equally use or enjoy the facilities, products, and services” being offered on them.

Although TMZ did not indicate the type of screen-reading software used by Nixon, the American Foundation for the Blind has a general description of these programs on its website, which notes that the software typically makes use of a speech synthesizer or braille display to translate the text as it appears on a computer screen. Screen readers are supported by various forms of desktop and mobile operating systems, including Windows, Mac OS, iOS, and Android, and can be downloaded for free or purchased for as much as $1,200, the AFB added.

Per TMZ, Nixon is suing Playboy’s websites for unspecified damages, with his lawsuit stating that he wants the company to make its online publications accessible for the blind and visually impaired.

Donald Nixon’s lawsuit against Playboy.com and Playboyshop.com is similar to the case of a legally blind woman who sued Kylie Jenner’s cosmetics company for allegedly failing to make its website compatible with her screen reading software. According to a previous report from TMZ, Antoinette Suchenko also cited the Americans with Disabilities Act in her suit against Kylie Inc., which didn’t seek a cash settlement, but rather requested that the company ‘s website “get up to [the] standards” required by the act.

Prior to the aforementioned cases, another legally blind individual sued Kourtney, Kim, and Khloe Kardashian’s Dash boutique, claiming that the company’s website was inaccessible to the visually impaired. According to the Hollywood Reporter, Andres Gomez, who uses the internet with the help of JAWS Screen Reader software, claimed in his lawsuit that the program wasn’t compatible with the Dash website, adding that he wasn’t given any alternative options to help him navigate it. The publication noted that Gomez had previously filed similar lawsuits against a number of other leading retailers, including Coach, Payless, and Ralph Lauren.