Some Doctors Say Making This Change To Your Diet Is More Important Than Cardio Or HIIT

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Today, just one quick Google search will provide those looking to lose weight with numerous explanations, new routines, and various diets and diet trends. Some say high-intensity interval training, otherwise known as HIIT, is the answer to all fitness routines. Others declare the way to handle weight loss is with strict cardio, and still others say it’s implementing a calorie deficit. While exercise like strength training has proven to help with weight loss and getting into shape, doctors such as Holly Lofton say that those not seeing progress are probably lacking in the nutrition department, reports Pop Sugar.

Dr. Lofton, director of the medical weight management program at NYU Langone, has remarked that “nutrition is paramount to the exercise.” She further explained that when one is working out, the body burns glycogen, which is the stored form of carbohydrates. This is burned first because it is the quickest form of energy. Once the glycogen has been burned, the body will then begin to burn your stored fat.

There is, however, a catch. “Dr. Lofton explained that someone who is overweight and has large glycogen stores will have a hard time burning fat because their body hasn’t burned off all of the glycogen.” This, of course, does not mean skipping a workout, since healthy exercise is also extremely important to a healthy lifestyle. Dr. Lofton has said, “It’s about being well rounded in both aspects.”

“It’s hard for this person to lose weight without a significant dietary change, and that’s going to be by cutting carbohydrates…. Restricting carbohydrates makes for a better strategy than restricting calories for maintaining weight loss.”

It was also pointed out that nobody is the same, and individuals should speak to an expert in order to determine a macronutrient profile — carbohydrates, fats, and protein — that best fit their personal needs.

It seems that many people are getting on board with at least a lower carb-based diet plan. Everyday Health reports that a new study has shed light on how low carb diets can boost metabolism, which is needed for weight loss. “For five months of the test, scientists made sure subjects maintained the same weight so they could measure their metabolisms according to the different diets. Ludwig and his team found that all calories are not alike to the body.” Doctor David Ludwig is the principal investigator in the study and an endocrinologist at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital in Massachusetts.