Queen Elizabeth’s ‘Creepy’ Childhood Doll Emerges, With A Huge Price Tag

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge and Queen Elizabeth II attend a children's sports event, with both laughing merrily.
Phil Noble / Getty Images

Queen Elizabeth is such a well-known and well-loved figure that has long been known to have an affectionate side, particularly for her animal companions. Now, as the Mirror details, royal watchers and collectors of royal paraphernalia will have the opportunity to buy one of the queen’s childhood friends — only in this case, said friend is inanimate.

Queen Elizabeth’s childhood doll, a well-loved companion in her journeys during the 1930s, has been unearthed and is set to hit the auction block. Kerry Taylor, an auctioneer specializing in fashion and antiques, claims that the rag doll belonged to Queen Elizabeth II when she was but a small princess.

“She would have been around nine or 10 years old probably when she got this doll.”

With curly blonde tresses and stunning blue eyes — eyes which are made of glass — the doll is a relic from an earlier age. And as the Express headline on the subject terms it, the doll does have a bit of a “creepy” aesthetic, at least according to modern sensibilities.

The doll features a velvet body, jointed limbs, and a felt face. It also comes with some wardrobe accessories in the form of a baby blue overcoat and matching booties with a pink accent. The booties match the dolls’ soft pink shirt.

From all indications, the antique doll was particularly favored by a young Elizabeth, as “you can see the little nose has been rubbed. It’s been heavily played with,” according to auctioneer Taylor. Taylor would go on to say that the fact that the doll has been obviously well-loved “only adds to the charm really.”

Having been manufactured by Chad Valley Toys, and having been owned by the former nanny to the royal family during this period of the Queen’s life — Clara “Allah” Knight, who would be known to the children as “Auntie Allah” at the time — the doll is set to be auctioned off in London on December 10. Taylor, who will be organizing the Passions for Fashions auction featuring the doll as a lot, elaborated on the excitement over the item.

“The doll really is a wonderful lot that we’re really excited about… It’s very rare that personal items belonging to the Queen come up for auction because she has always been such a private person… The young princesses at that time were not inundated with toys so what they had was precious.”

Taylor suggests that she expects the doll to sell for anywhere between £800 to £1200, or $1,025 to $1,535 respectively.