2018 iPad Pro Still Inspiring Love/Hate Relationship With Owners

David Johnson

Hands down, the 2018 iPad Pro is one of the most controversial products Apple has ever made. Pundits are not just arguing with one another about it. They are arguing with themselves. After living with it for a few weeks, Rene Ritchie of iMore claimed he was wrong about the iPad Pro and did a re-review. That is unprecedented in this space.

The problem is that both defenders and detractors of the 2018 iPad Pro are right. Every praise of the product is true. Every criticism is true. And every rebuttal on either side is true. Even in an article intended to praise the iPad by 9TO5Mac, some of the same criticisms came through that have been leveled by everyone else.

"While the iPad Pro isn't trying to be a Mac, it is a grown-up device and it needs a grown-up operating system. Not macOS, but rather a tailored version of iOS, designed to take advantage of the additional capabilities of the iPad. What some people have termed padOS.

Here's what I'd consider the minimum acceptable spec for padOS – if you gave me these things, I'd be pretty happy:

• A Home screen with a fully-flexible layout

• Properly windowed apps

• Support for a trackpad"

Here's what I'd consider the minimum acceptable spec for padOS – if you gave me these things, I'd be pretty happy:

• A Home screen with a fully-flexible layout

• Properly windowed apps

• Support for a trackpad"

Every reviewer acknowledges the iPad Pro as the best of breed, without peer. Now, Apple wants you to think of the iPad Pro as more than an iPad. But the universal consensus is that the OS and software just aren't there.

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