Democrat Jim Glenn Just Won His Kentucky House Race By A Single Vote

Glenn's race was one of a handful in Kentucky to come down to fewer than 10 votes.

Democrat Jim Glenn Just Won His Kentucky House Race By A Single Vote
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Glenn's race was one of a handful in Kentucky to come down to fewer than 10 votes.

Jim Glenn knows very well that in American elections, every vote matters.

As Tristate Homepage reported, the Democrat just won his race for the Kentucky state house by a single vote. The razor-thin margin was confirmed after a re-canvass of the vote tally completed late this week.

Glenn said he was thrilled with the result.

“I was happy that the public got a chance to see that every vote counts, which is what we saw in the basic election,” Glenn said.

Glenn’s Republican opponent, D.J. Johnson, said he may consider asking for a full recount of the race. As Tristate Homepage reported, anyone seeking a full recount has to cover the costs.

“It went as expected. I didn’t expect any changes. At this point, we’re still in the process, step one. I’m meeting with the team, talking with them to consider a recount,” Johnson said.

Though everyone who cast a ballot for Glenn could be considered the one who topped the race in his favor, CBS News focused on 76-year-old Mary Beverly Goetz, who requested an absentee ballot because she was worried that her health problems would prevent her from getting to the voting booth on Election Day. Goetz sent in her ballot a few weeks before the election, voting for Glenn in the western Kentucky state House district.

She was happy that her vote helped to keep Glenn in the seat he has held for 12 years.

“It made me feel good,” Goetz said. “It made you feel like your vote really counted.”

As the report noted, there were a number of other incredibly close races for the Kentucky state house. Republican Nancy Tate won her race by six votes. Democrat Kathy Hinkle won by five votes and fellow Democrat Cluster Howard won by seven votes.

In another Kentucky county, votes were tied on a measure about whether to sell alcohol at a state park. The measure had to be determined by a coin flip, which went in favor of selling alcohol.

There have been other, much more important measures determined by a coin flip in the past year. In Virginia, the state’s House majority was up for grabs when Republican David Yancey and Democrat Shelly Simmonds tied their race. As the Huffington Post noted, officials went to a tie-breaker — pulling names out of a hat. Yancey’s name ended up being pulled, ensuring that Republicans were able to maintain control of the house after a surge of victories for Democrats.