‘Bachelor’ Alum Chris Soules Pleads Guilty For April 2017 Fatal Car Crash

Chris Soules is facing an aggravated misdemeanor charge for leaving the scene of a car crash that left one dead.

Chris Soules answering interview questions
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Chris Soules is facing an aggravated misdemeanor charge for leaving the scene of a car crash that left one dead.

Thirty-seven-year-old Chris Soules of ABC’s 19th season of The Bachelor has pleaded guilty for leaving the scene of an Iowa car crash in April 2017. According to People, Soules crashed his car into a tractor running it off the road into a ditch. The driver of the tractor was 66-year-old Vietnam veteran Kenneth E. Mosher, who died as a result of the accident.

Soules did reportedly call 911 regarding the accident and identified himself over the phone. He also attempted to provide CPR to Mosher while the ambulance was on its way. However, Soules did not provide the registration number of his vehicle and left the scene prior to the arrival of law enforcement, a violation of Iowa state code. Police eventually found Soules and his vehicle at his residence. He did not agree to leave his home until several hours later when the police returned with a search warrant. He was then arrested and charged with fleeing the scene of an accident.

On Tuesday, the reality television star submitted a conditional guilty plea to the Iowa District Court. He could potentially be ordered to pay a fine of no more $6,250 and/or spend a maximum of two years in prison. Soules went on to request that a PSI report be completed in advance of his sentencing and that in exchange for his plea, he will face no further charges.

In addition to the conditional guilty plea, Soules went on to recount the events of the night of the crash. He admitted that though he identified himself to 911 dispatch, he did not provide his vehicle registration number to law enforcement officers.

“By way of factual basis, I hereby state that on or about April 24, 2017 in Buchanan County, Iowa, I was driving a vehicle that was involved in an accident resulting in serious injury to another person. I knew the accident occurred and knew it resulted in an injury to another person. Though I immediately stopped, called 911 and identified myself, and rendered reasonable aid to the injured person — including requesting an ambulance and administering CPR while the ambulance was en route — I acknowledge I did not provide the registration number of the vehicle I was driving.”

Initially, Soules had entered a plea of not guilty to the charge in May of 2017. Soules’ legal team filed a motion to dismiss the “failure to remain” charge. Their request was later denied in January before reaching the Supreme Court.

Soules will face sentencing in January of 2019.