Ian David Long’s Cause Of Death Confirmed As Self-Inflicted Gunshot Wound

The Borderline Bar and Grill shooter killed 12 people Wednesday night then took his own life.

Ian David Long’s Cause Of Death Confirmed As Self-Inflicted Gunshot Wound
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The Borderline Bar and Grill shooter killed 12 people Wednesday night then took his own life.

Former Marine machine-gunner Ian David Long shot and killed 12 people at the Borderline Bar and Grill in Thousand Oaks, California, on Wednesday night. New York Daily News reports that Ventura County Sheriff Bill Ayub announced Saturday that Long took his own life as well. Ayub told reporters that an autopsy of the 28-year-old confirmed his cause of death as a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Authorities have yet to identify a motive and say they are investigating every possible avenue. One suggested motive is that Long may have believed that a former girlfriend was among the 150 people at the Borderline that night. Several people who said they visit the bar often said they had never seen the shooter before. Sheriff’s Captain Garo Kuredjian told reporters that Long’s car has been searched, a warrant has been served that will allow a search of his home, and witness interviews are ongoing. He predicted an investigation that may last months.

Authorities say Long’s military experience was reflected in the accuracy of his shots. Using a .45-caliber pistol, he killed every person he shot at. Many others were injured trying to escape the line of fire and destruction within the bar that happened as a result of the shooting.

Another item that will be the subject of investigation is Long’s social media accounts. The timestamp on a post he made to Instagram on Wednesday indicates it was made during the shooting. In that post, he wonders whether people will question his sanity following the shooting. Long’s social media accounts have now been taken down.

Long had no criminal record, but those who knew him describe unsettling encounters with a man who seemed to be a loner. Dominique Colell knew Long in high school and described him as at times combative both verbally and physically.

“I literally feared for myself around him. He was the only athlete that I was scared of,” he said. Colell recalled a time that Long pretended to shoot her in the back of her head while she spoke to a student athlete. Another time, she says he grabbed her by her ear and midsection after she refused to give him a cellphone he said belonged to him.

In April, officers were called to the home Long shared with his mother after reports of yelling and loud banging noises. The Telegraph reported that neighbor Richard Berge described Long as “raving hell in the house, you know, kicking holes in the wall and stuff” during the April incident. He said police were in a standoff with him for about four hours. Berge cared for Long’s mother’s dogs and said that she feared he may kill himself, but never feared for her own safety. A mental health specialist spoke with Long following that incident and stated that they believed he may have been suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. They were unable, however, to determine a basis for involuntarily hospitalizing Long.