Oprah Fires Back At Racist Robocalls Impersonating Her, Saying ‘Jesus Don’t Like Ugly’

Urges people to get out and vote in Instagram video.

Oprah Winfrey Campaigns With Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate Stacey Abrams
Jessica McGowan / Getty Images

Urges people to get out and vote in Instagram video.

Oprah Winfrey responded to the white supremacist group that made racist robocalls impersonating her and targeting Georgia candidate for governor Stacey Abrams. In a post on Instagram, the megastar slammed the group, saying “Jesus don’t like ugly, and we know what to do about that” before urging voters to get out and vote.

Last week, a group called The Road to Power allegedly funded a robocall aimed at Georgia voters after the mogul showed up in Georgia to support Stacey Abrams’ campaign against Brian Kemp. According to the New York Post, in the racist call, an Oprah impersonator tells voters that they will “get a car” if they vote for the “negress” Abrams.

“This is the magical negro, Oprah Winfrey, asking you to make my fellow negress, Stacey Abrams, the governor of Georgia,” a voice impersonating Winfrey says. “Where others see a poor man’s Aunt Jemima, I see someone white women can be tricked into voting for, especially the fat ones.”

The group, which has been labeled as anti-Semitic and white supremacist by the Anti-Defamation League, also sent out racist robocalls aimed at voters in Florida for gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillam.

When Oprah heard about the call, she returned fire.

“I heard people were making racist robocalls in my name against Stacey Abrams, who I am one hundred percent for, in Georgia,” Winfrey explained. “I just want to say: Jesus don’t like ugly…And we know what to do about that: vote. Tomorrow show up and show out, and vote.”

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The antidote to Hate… VOTE your love!

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Oprah went door to door in Georgia to stump for Stacey Abrams, who is in a tight race against Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp. The race has been plagued by accusations of voter suppression and releasing misleading information regarding voter system hacking in the state.

The calls went out to an unknown number of voters in the state last Friday, and while the Kemp campaign declined to comment on the specifics, Kemp called the robocalls “vile” and “absolutely disgusting.”

“I stand against any person or organization that peddles this type of unbridled hate and unapologetic bigotry,” he said.

Abrams responded to reports about the calls by calling out Kemp.

“Brian Kemp has only now suddenly decided to find a conscience as polls are tightening and Georgia voters are making it clear that they reject the kind of hate he and his allies have been spewing around the state,” spokesperson Abigail Collazo said.

Collazo also laid blame at the feet of President Trump, saying that he helped create a political climate that celebrates this type of behavior.