On The 10th Anniversary Of Barack Obama’s Election, Twitter Shows How Much They Miss Him

Barack Obama marked the 10th anniversary of his presidential win with an instagram post.
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Twitter users showed their love for Barack Obama on the 10th anniversary of his election as President of the United States in a unique display of affection for the former commander in chief.

The Huffington Post reflected that it was just 10 years ago the people of America elected a young senator from Illinois with the name of Barack Obama to be the nations 44th president on the historic night of Nov. 4, 2008.

Obama took to his Instagram page to reflect on the significant date and his hopes for the future as Americans head to the polls on November 6 for the midterm elections.

The Washington Post explained that midterm elections are the elections that take place halfway through a president’s four-year term. They cover a huge range of contests, from congressional seats all the way down to small-town mayoral races and county sheriffs. Most importantly, 35 of the 100 Senate seats are up for grabs.

“When more people get off the sidelines and decide to participate, our country becomes a little more representative of its people ― of everyone’s collective decision,” Obama wrote. “And American politics can change as a result.”

“On Election Day this Tuesday, I’m not just asking you to vote. I’m asking you to really show up once again. Talk with your friends, convince some new voters, and get them out to vote because then something powerful happens. Change happens,” he continued.

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As I reflect on election night ten years ago today, I can’t help but think about where my political career started. I wasn’t running for office. I was running a voter-registration drive in Chicago. What I learned then — and what would become the premise of my 2008 campaign — was that you couldn't just fight for existing votes. You had to reach out to all of these people who had lost faith and lost trust, and get them off the sidelines. So during our first campaign, when I started seeing all these stories about record turnout in communities all over the country — from young people in line for hours in Iowa to elderly folks in lawn chairs down in Florida — I knew that we had shown what is possible when everybody decides to participate. And that, in and of itself, gave people a sense of their own power — their own agency in the kind of country we want to leave for our kids. When more people get off the sidelines and decide to participate, our country becomes a little more representative of its people — of everyone's collective decision. And American politics can change as a result. So on Election Day this Tuesday, I’m not just asking you to vote. I'm asking you to really show up once again. Talk with your friends, convince some new voters, and get them out to vote because then something powerful happens. Change happens. Hope happens. And with each new step we take in the direction of fairness, and justice, and equality, and opportunity, hope spreads.

A post shared by Barack Obama (@barackobama) on

Obama’s anniversary was feted on Twitter by supporters of the former president, and those who just want to see change affected, agreeing with Obama’s plea to vote in this all-important midterm election.

The New York Times reposted their cover story of the election on their Twitter page, honoring the significant change that was made upon the election of Barack Obama to the office of United States President.

In 2008, the New York Times reported that Obama defeated Senator John McCain, Republican of Arizona, a former prisoner of war who was making his second bid for the presidency alongside vice-presidential running mate Sarah Palin.

McCain’s concession speech was one of hope for the future as well, asking those of his supporters who booed upon the mention of the new president’s name to hush.

McCain said in his closing statements, “I urge all Americans who supported me to join me in not just congratulating him, but offering our next president our goodwill and earnest effort to find ways to come together.”

Obama, alongside Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton, were among the three former presidents hand-picked by McCain to deliver eulogies during his memorial service this past August.

Voting for the midterm elections is November 6, 2018.