Democrat Kyrsten Sinema Gets Huge Boost In AZ Senate Race As Green Party Candidate Drops Out To Endorse Her

Congresswoman Kyrsten Sinema at the 2018 Human Rights Campaign
Rich Fury / Getty Images for Human Rights Campaign (HRC)

In an announcement that could have a major impact on the race for the senate in Arizona, Green Party candidate Angela Green has dropped out of the running and endorsed Democratic candidate Kyrsten Sinema on her way out.

As 12 News reported, Green holds much the same values as Sinema and the Democratic party in the state of Arizona and thought that perhaps her candidacy was pulling support from the Democrats in the senate race. At the time of the announcement, she was polling around 6% in what is considered to be a tight race for the state.

Just five days out from election day, the decision could help to boost Sinema and push her numbers past Republican opposition candidate Congresswoman Martha McSally. Before Green’s withdrawal, Sinema and McSally were polling around a point or two from one another.

Green, who is a newcomer on the major political stage, explained her decision.

“I want them to vote for a better Arizona, and that would be for Kyrsten Sinema…. What I’m looking to do to help Arizona become more green again. After watching the debates and seeing everything, Sinema’s stance on a lot of things are very close to mine.”

Green also shared that the decision was not an easy one to make, but given how close her own values and plans are to that of Sinema and the Democrats for the state, she feels comfortable stepping back to give them the edge and endorsing them along the way.

She added that there are reason’s “she can’t support the other candidates,” but that the main reason was to give Arizona a clear leader to vote for in Sinema, who would help to make the state more environmentally friendly.

Although she was a viable candidate, votes for third parties tend to be protest votes against the two main parties, the Democrats and the Republicans. In recent years, the Green Party’s agenda has become very much aligned with the Democrats, who also tend to fight for more environmentally friendly practices across the country.

“I have to make the decision that makes sense,” Green said. “I can’t go up against two people who have spent $50 million on their campaigns.”

Green was also denied an opportunity to make her voice heard by the Arizona people when she was excluded from the only senate debate on October 15, broadcast by PBS.

“I was denied that at PBS that day… and was escorted out and wasn’t able to do my free election, free campaign, free anything,” Green lamented. “It was really disheartening to me… I wanted to represent the voice of those who are tired of the nonsense.”

It is estimated that approximately 60 percent of votes in Arizona have already been cast during early voting. Green’s name will remain on the ballot despite her withdrawal.