Trump Jr. Likes Tweet Promoting ‘Fake Bombs’ Conspiracy Theory

This is not the first time for the president's son to push conspiracy theories.

Trump Jr. Likes Tweet Promoting 'Fake Bombs' Conspiracy Theory
Shannon Finney / Getty Images

This is not the first time for the president's son to push conspiracy theories.

Donald Trump Jr. liked a Twitter message promoting a far-right conspiracy theory pertaining to bombs sent to President Trump’s critics and opponents, The Daily Beast reports.

“Breaking: White Powder in bombs not biological or dangerous. Likely baby powder,” the tweet accompanied by a Fox News video says. “#FakeBombHoax #VoteRed.”

Far-right Twitter users are theorizing that bombs sent to George Soros, Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, Joe Biden, Maxine Waters, CNN, and Robert De Niro — all of whom are either President Trump’s fierce critics, political opponents, or both — were so-called “false flags,” covert operations designed to produce sympathy among the American public, and tip the scales in the favor of the Democratic Party in the upcoming midterm elections.

According to the New York Times, some prominent right-wing media figures have picked up on the conspiracy theory, spreading it to their followers.

Political commentator Ann Coulter, radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh, and radio host Michael Savage, for instance, have all taken to the conspiracy theory, spreading it on social media and elsewhere, alleging that President Trump’s opponents are mailing the bombs themselves.

The conspiratorial-minded seem to be fond of President Trump, and the “fake bombs” conspiracy theory is merely the latest that’s spread across the Trump base, with at least two having previously gone viral: PizzaGate and the QAnon conspiracy theory.

Somewhat related, the two viral conspiracy theories allege that there exists an elite cabal of pedophiles and child traffickers. The QAnon conspiracy theory builds upon Pizzagate, alleging that President Trump is fighting against the elite, “draining the swamp,” so to speak.

For Trump Jr., however, this is not the first time that he promoted and spread conspiracy theories, The Daily Beast notes.

Earlier this year, Trump Jr. liked a tweet featuring a wild conspiracy theory which alleges that Parkland shooting survivor and gun control advocate David Hogg is in fact some deep state operative, a plant — trained by his father, who’s a former FBI agent — on a mission to take everyone’s guns away.

The POTUS, much like Trump Jr., does not shy away from pushing conspiracy theories.

In 2012 via Twitter he alleged that the concept of global warming “was created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive,” and in another Twitter message now-President Trump linked vaccines to autism.

More recently, as detailed by a previous Inquisitr report, President Trump suggested that billionaire George Soros was bankrolling individuals protesting Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Despite lack of evidence, Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence both spread another conspiracy theory just days ago, claiming that Middle Easterners are among thousands travelling to the United States via Mexico, according to Business Insider.