Meghan McCain Admits To Spreading Hate Towards Hillary Clinton, Apologizes On ‘The View’

Meghan McCain still grieving over death of father John McCain.
ABC / Disney ABC Press

On the latest episode of The View, Meghan McCain momentarily set aside talk of President Trump’s response to the recent spate of bomb scares so that she could apologize for what role she may have played in fueling the nation’s political divide.

Heading into Thursday’s (October 25) production, McCain found herself contending with criticism over a report from Raw Story that pointed out how quick she was to relate past incidents of heckling against Republicans to the terroristic threats waged against philanthropist George Soros, CNN’s Manhattan news bureau, and figures as high up in the Democratic Party’s leadership as Presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton.

After doing “much soul-searching” and consulting with ABC producers, however, the 34-year-old conservative media personality put a halt to the energy she was putting into a Twitter feud with the publication, in the interest of owning up to the narratives she’s strewn. McCain would use the popular daytime platform to declare that she is prepared to reexamine her tone when engaging such topics.

“I really try every day, I really try to come into work thinking about what rhetoric I’m going to put out into the world and what my father would have done if he was still here. Last year on this show, I said I hate Hillary Clinton and I called her Crooked Hillary and it’s one of the things I regret doing,” the Washington Post quotes McCain as having told the live audience.

“Hate is not a word that should be coming out of my mouth on television about someone of a different political persuasion,” she said.

McCain would also condemn President Trump’s immediate handling of the emergency. Had she been in a position to advise him, she said she would have invited House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.), former Vice President Joe Biden, and a combination of other Democrats to join him for a press conference to show unity in light of what had unfolded.

Still, although she concedes that she no longer entrusts the president to put bygones aside in an effort to prioritize non-partisanship, McCain asserted that she is willing to lead by example in holding herself to account. The hope, McCain said, is that others in print, radio, and television will do the same.

“I think that us in the media, as people who host a show that people watch, on politics, we also have to hold ourselves to a standard,” she said.