Jamal Khashoggi Had Chilling Final Words For Fiancée Before He Entered Saudi Consulate, Never To Come Out

Jamal Khashoggi's final words to his fiancée Hatice Cengiz appear to reveal that he feared something would happen to him inside the Saudi consulate.

Donald Trump, Jamal Khashoggi, Saudi Arabia, Hatice Cengiz, Mohammed bin Salam
Chris McGrath / Getty Images

Jamal Khashoggi's final words to his fiancée Hatice Cengiz appear to reveal that he feared something would happen to him inside the Saudi consulate.

Jamal Khashoggi, the Washington Post journalist who was a leading critic of Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, on October 2, and never came out. In a recent op-ed essay for the New York Times, Khashoggi’s fiancée, who accompanied him to the consulate that day, but waited for him outside, revealed his final words to her, and they appear to indicate that Khashoggi knew he might be in danger inside the consulate.

Khashoggi was indeed in danger. According to multiple media reports previously covered by the Inquisitr, the 60-year-old longtime reporter and editor, who considered himself a Saudi “patriot,” was met inside the consulate by a death squad of 15 Saudi agents believed to have been sent by the Saudi regime. The assassins allegedly murdered Khashoggi in brutal and sadistic fashion, according to the reports, dismembering him even while he remained alive, and eventually beheading him.

As the Inquisitr reported, reports out of the Middle East have linked at least seven of the 15 assassins directly to the crown prince, as members of the Saudi ruler’s personal security team, who had previously accompanied bin Salman, who is popularly known as “MBS,” on his official state visits to other countries.

Donald Trump, Jamal Khashoggi, Saudi Arabia, Hatice Cengiz, Mohammed bin Salam
A Turkish police forensic investigator searches for evidence of Jamal Khashoggi’s murder inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul Wednesday. Chris McGrath / Getty Images

But while Khashoggi’s fiancée, Hatice Cengiz, a doctoral student at a university in Istanbul, said in her essay that she and Khashoggi “had no foreboding of what was to come” when he made a trip to the Saudi consulate to fill out paperwork finalizing his divorce and allowing him to marry Cengiz. He nonetheless gave her a chilling instruction in his final words to her before he entered the Saudi compound.

“When we arrived at the consulate, he went right in. He told me to alert the Turkish authorities if I did not hear from him soon,” she wrote.

But she did not hear from him soon, or any time since, and the apparent murder of Khashoggi has set off a crisis in U.S. relations with Saudi Arabia as well as in the crown prince’s own grip on power within Saudi Arabia. On Thursday, a group of prominent Saudi scholars published a statement calling for MBS to be removed from his post atop the Saudi government, according to the Turkish newspaper, Yeni Safak.

“If the allegations are true, and Jamal has been murdered by the errand boys of Mohammed bin Salman, he is already a martyr. His loss is not just mine but that of every person with a conscience and moral compass,” Cengiz wrote in her NYT op-ed. “If we have already lost Jamal, then condemnation is not enough. The people who took him from us, irrespective of their political positions, must be held accountable and punished to the full extent of the law.”