Britain’s Harlequin Ladybug Invasion Compared To A “Biblical Plague” As The STD-Riddled Insects Take Over

A Ladybug in flight
Dan Kitwood / Getty Images

Britain is under attack! But not by foreign forces or a terrorist threat. The United Kingdom’s green and pleasant shores are being invaded by an army of cannibalistic ladybugs riddled with sexually transmitted diseases.

The Mirror reports that the terrifying invaders flying in from Asia and North America are targeting homes in the U.K.

The Harlequin ladybirds are so named because they have black instead of red wings and they are currently seeking safe hibernation spots before the onset of winter.

Most homes in the U.K. have now turned their heating on to keep the autumn chill at bay and thus provided a perfect haven for the insects to spread their wings and flourish.

Which is bad news for Britain’s two-spot ladybirds, which are being eaten by the promiscuous Harlequins.

Researchers have discovered that ladybugs love to have sex and in areas where they live in high densities, STDs run rampant.

And they’re certainly flocking together in great numbers in Britain at the moment.

British heptathlete and British Olympian Kelly Sotherton was horrified to be the victim of a Harlequin home invasion and tweeted her disgust.

“Get home and welcomed by swarms of ladybirds in every window #ladybirdinvasion.”

And the athlete wasn’t alone. Thousands of Brits have shared their terror on social media.

A Twitter user known as DoubleIn160 compared the ladybird eruption to that of a “biblical plague.”

In Bramcote Park, Ilkeston, a lady named Laura Jayne was taking her hounds for an afternoon stroll and when she returned home she was covered from head to toe in ladybugs. It was said to be like some sort of insect apocalypse.

The dog walker explained “I took my dogs for a walk around Bramcote park in Ilkeston and there was a huge ladybird swarm.

“Must of been thousands flying around in just one area.”

Kathryn Tyler refused to take the ladybug invasion lying down and furiously tweeted, “Losing my s*** here over the little buggers”.

A pair or more than two ladybugs is called a “loveliness of ladybugs” but there seems to be no love for these colorful insects in Britain at the moment.

Although the Harlequin Ladybugs carry a sexually-transmitted disease called Laboulbeniales fungal disease which is harmful to Britain’s native species, the Harlequins are not thought to pose a threat to humans.

Steve McGrail, director of pest control company Pro Kill Environment, simply warned people to shut their windows and ride the storm out.

“Harlequin Ladybirds are not harmful to humans but recommended sealing windows to make sure they do not get in homes.”