William Clyde Allen Reportedly Confesses To Sending Potentially Poisonous Mail To White House, Donald Trump

The packages tested positive for ricin, a deadly poison derived from castor beans.

William Clyde Allen reportedly confessed to sending a package to the white house
Davis County Sheriff's Office

The packages tested positive for ricin, a deadly poison derived from castor beans.

William Clyde Allen, the Utah Navy veteran who allegedly sent a “suspicious” package to the White House, allegedly confessed to this crime, according to a police affidavit made available by CNN.

As previously reported by the Inquisitr, this week at least three envelopes containing components of the deadly poison ricin were delivered to Washington: two to the Pentagon and one to the White House. The one intended for the White House was intercepted long before it reached the building, and no one – including the president – was exposed to the poison or ever in any danger. Similarly, the two Pentagon envelopes, addressed to Defense Secretary James Mattis and Admiral John Richardson, Chief of Naval Operations, were intercepted at the Pentagon’s central mail processing facility; no one there is believed to have been exposed to any poisons, either.

According to a follow-up Inquisitr report, the letters were traced to Logan, Utah, and authorities arrested William Clyde Allen III, 39. Allen, according to Military Times, was a Navy veteran who served between 1998 and 2002.

The letters tested positive for ricin, which is derived from castor beans. Allen allegedly purchased the castor beans, ground them up, put them in envelopes and then mailed them to their intended targets. What’s more, once he was taken into custody, Allen allegedly confessed to grinding up the beans and sending them.

As of this writing, it is unclear if Allen has revealed a motive. If he did indeed discuss a motive with investigators, that information has not been revealed to the public.

A review of Allen’s naval career by Military Times reveals an utterly unremarkable four years. He enlisted in 1998 and then four years later, having achieved the rank of E-2. He had at one point achieved the rank of E-4, meaning that at least twice he had to have been demoted for various infractions, although as of this writing it is not clear when or why.

He attended the Damage Controlman “A” school at Naval Station Great Lakes in Illinois; spent 15 months on the combat support ship Supply, and another 17 months on the ship Detroit, where he worked as a damage control fireman apprentice.

During his career, he received a handful of awards and commendations, described by the Times as “mostly standard-issue.”