Prince William Says Kate Middleton Is ‘Jealous’ Of Africa Trip

Prince William and Kate Middleton at Wimbledon
Clive Brunskill / Getty Images

As Prince William continues his solo tour through Africa, he has dropped some insight into how his wife Kate Middleton feels about his trip, saying that Middleton is “jealous” of his experience, according to reports from Fox News.

During the Namibia leg of his trip, William took part in a reception in the capital city of Windhoek and was in a jovial mood, speaking to guests about how he was “delighted” to have the opportunity to visit the African country while also being able to enjoy a “few good uninterrupted nights” of sleep while away from his family.

Moving on from his jokes, William did make clear that the family was disappointed they could not take the trip together, saying, “I am only sorry that my wife Catherine is not able to join me.” William also added that Middleton was “immensely jealous” of William’s chance to visit the continent.

Middleton has remained in England to care for the couple’s three children while William will continue his trek across Africa, which will continue to Tanzania and Kenya, the country where the future king of England proposed to his wife.

William has embarked on the tour as the president of the United for Wildlife organization. The organization aims to protect against the poaching of African wildlife, in particular, the heavily targeted rhinos and elephants. Both William and his brother Harry have always seen Africa as a special place since they first saw the continent when they were children.

“My visit to Namibia this week is focused on conservation,” said William while he was visiting the residence of the British High Commissioner to Namibia. “This is an issue very close to my heart, and I know is a matter of deep pride to you all as well. Your country is famous for its beautiful environment and wildlife. This is the reason why so many tourists, including tens of thousands of Brits, visit every year.”

William went on to speak of the tourism angle as another reason to preserve the wildlife of Africa, saying, “Tourism continues to grow year on year and in 2017 accounted for 100,000 jobs — with the potential to add many more. Protecting Namibia’s wildlife is crucial to realizing this potential. I have been very lucky to see firsthand today in the Kunene region some outstanding conservation work.”

While his trip so far has included plenty of meeting and greeting, William has also had the chance to visit the animals he seeks to protect up close, taking an early morning safari while in Namibia to see the country’s rhinoceroses, as was covered by the Inquisitr.