UK PM Theresa May Says She Trusts Trump, Touts Their ‘Special Relationship’ With One Another

The prime minister and the president have not always seen eye to eye on every issue, clashing on immigration policies and Russia.

United Kingdom Prime Minister Theresa May and U.S. President Donald Trump.
Dan Kitwood / Getty Images

The prime minister and the president have not always seen eye to eye on every issue, clashing on immigration policies and Russia.

As she and hundreds of other leaders from around the world prepare to gather for the United Nations General Assembly later this week, United Kingdom Prime Minister Theresa May expressly stated in a recent interview that she trusts United States President Donald Trump.

May reiterated her confidence in Trump during an interview with CBS This Morning co-host John Dickerson, who asked the leader of Parliament whether she was sure the president listened to her during their conversations.

“Yes, we have very good discussions,” May said. “And these are, I mean, the point of the special relationship between the United Kingdom and the United States in a sense is that we can have those frank and open discussions.”

She repeated the term “special relationship” in a separate question where she was asked whether she had full trust in dealing with Trump.

“Well, yes. I mean, we work together. We have a special relationship. This is two people reflecting as leaders of their two countries – the relationship that those two countries have and have built up over a number of years.”

The 73rd session of the UN General Assembly officially opened last week, on September 18. The first date of debate among the nations will begin on Tuesday, September 25, according to reporting from the International Institute for Sustainable Development.

Despite May assuring viewers that she and Trump have a “special relationship,” the two have not always seen eye to eye on every issue. Earlier this summer, May was critical of Trump’s immigration policies, specifically those targeting the separation of undocumented immigrants from their children crossing the southern U.S. border.

“[T]he pictures of children being held in what appear to be cages are deeply disturbing. This is wrong,” May said at the time, according to The Guardian.

Trump has also voiced his disdain with May’s negotiation skills, specifically her ability to broker an agreement between her nation and the European Union, as the UK heads toward fulfilling its voter-approved Brexit.

“She should negotiate the best way she knows how, but it’s too bad what’s going on,” Trump said during his visit to the UK in July, according to reporting from CNN.

Also earlier this summer, May blasted Trump for his consideration of Russia re-joining the G-7 group of nations (a move that would officially make it the G-8 again). After Trump made the suggestion, May reiterated why Russia was removed from the organization in the first place.

“We should remind ourselves why the G-8 became the G-7, it was because Russia illegally annexed Crimea,” May said. “We have seen malign activity from Russia in a whole variety of ways, of course including on the streets of Salisbury in the UK,” referring to a nerve agent attack allegedly carried out by the Kremlin within the UK.