Prince William Jets Off To Africa On Specially Branded Aircraft

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Prince William is off on a tour of three African countries – Tanzania, Kenya, and Namibia – and departed on Sunday in a special aircraft from Heathrow International Airport.

As Royal Central reported, the Duke of Cambridge’s British Airways flight was specially branded for the occasion, paying homage to the prince’s primary cause in undertaking the African tour this time around.

The A380 aircraft displayed the message “#EndWildlifeCrime” toward the front of the plane, just behind the nose. Before departing, William posed with Head of Conservation Programmes for United for Wildlife Naomi Doak, Senior First Officer Holly Tucker, Manager for British Airways Community Investment Mary Barry, and CEO of Tusk Trust Charlie Mayhew in front of the aircraft for a photo op.

William, who is the patron of the Royal African Society, is undertaking this visit as his first in an official capacity for the organization. He is also the president for the umbrella organization United for Wildlife and the Tusk Trust. He hopes to learn how poaching is being prevented in Africa, and what is being done to protect the animals most at risk from poachers.

This tour also falls just before the 2018 Illegal Wildlife Trade Conference which takes place in London on October 10 and 11, at which the prince will be in attendance as well.

During his time in Namibia, Prince William will meet with Vice President Nangolo Mbumb and will attend a function hosted by British High Commissioner Kate Airey in celebration of the UK’s relationship with Namibia. Aside from his focus on protecting wildlife in the southern African country, he also plans to meet with “business leaders, young people and mental health activists.”

In Tanzania, he will be visiting the port in Dar es Salaam, where he will “see the work being done on the ground” to help “combat the illegal wildlife trade.” While there, he will also be meeting with President John Magufuli to discuss the country’s efforts in combating the major threat poachers pose to the rapidly depleting wildlife numbers.

While in Kenya, the prince will not only learn about the country’s fight to protect wildlife but will also meet the 1st Battalion Irish Guards battlegroup in his capacity as Colonel in Chief of the Irish Guards. The battlegroup is in the country working with the infantry of the Kenyan army, and the duke will learn how they are working together for the benefits of both Kenya and the UK.