Anthony Bourdain Wins Six Emmy Awards, Months After His Death

Bourdain won the awards for 'Parts Unknown'

'Anthony Bourdain Parts Unknown: Japan with Masa' Screening
Mike Coppola / Getty Images

Bourdain won the awards for 'Parts Unknown'

Chef Anthony Bourdain, who died in June of suicide, won six Emmy Awards tonight for his CNN show, Parts Unknown. Bourdain ended his life in a French hotel on June 8 while on location for his food travel series.

The Daily Mail reported that Bourdain’s Emmy Awards were won in a variety of categories.

“The late American chef and travel documentarian’s CNN show won best writing for a non-fiction program, sound editing for a non-fiction program, sound mixing for a non-fiction program and picture editing for a non-fiction program. The show also won best informational series or special as well as short-form non-fiction or reality.”

But these were not the celebrity chef’s first Emmy Awards, as he took home the statues for four years in 2016, 2015, 2014 and 2013. A Parts Unknown colleague accepted the awards in Bourdain’s honor and gave a brief speech.

“For me and for all the folks that have worked for him in the last 20 years, I want to say his writing was always fiercely intelligent, real, no bulls**t. His writing was inimitable; he’s truly on a journey to parts unknown. We wish we could have shot that journey with him.”

Anthony Bourdain meant a lot to many people including those in the me too movement, even though the chef himself said he was sorry that he was late to the game himself. He apologized if he wasn’t the kind of boss that women could confide in.

“I came out of a brutal, oppressive business that was historically unfriendly to women. I knew a lot of women, it turned out, who had stories about their experiences — about people I knew — who did not feel I was the sort of person they could confide in.”

Through his relationship with actor Asia Argento, who claims that Harvey Weinstein violated her, Bourdain says he learned a great deal about the after-effects of sexual assault.

“I’d like to say that I was only enlightened in some way or I’m an activist or virtuous, but in fact, I have to be honest with myself. I met one extraordinary woman with an extraordinary and painful story, who introduced me to a lot of other women with extraordinary stories and suddenly it was personal.”

Before his death, Anthony Bourdain said he was struggling to make sense of his relationships with many of the chefs and others embroiled in the “me too” scandals, and said that he wasn’t ready to forgive them.

“I’m not in a forgiving state of mind. I mean, that s**t ain’t OK.”