Larry Nassar Transferred To Florida Prison After Safety Concerns

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It’s hard to believe that Larry Nassar is already on his third prison following his guilty sentence.

According to the Detroit News, Nassar has been moved to Coleman II United States Penitentiary in Sumterville, Florida, following a brief stay at an Oklahoma Federal Transfer Center. The facility in Florida is for high-profile criminals and it has been described as a place that is “safe.”

During his first period of time in prison, Nassar was in Tucson, Arizona, but was moved from there after he was assaulted by other prisoners within just a few hours of being released into the general population. Many specialists have noted that Nassar is a hard prisoner to keep in jail because his case has been so highly publicized.

Retired Bureau of Prisons employee Ralph Miller says that it is likely that an investigation showed that Nassar could not be kept safe in the Tucson prison as it houses a high number of sex offenders. But, he noted that Coleman is good for Nassar since it’s home to two high-security penitentiaries as well as three other facilities.

Miller described the Florida prison as “a ‘safe’ facility where informants, former cops, ex-gang members, check-ins (prisoners who intentionally put themselves in solitary confinement to be safe), homosexuals, and sex offenders can all, supposedly, walk the yard freely. At regular BOP lockups, these types of men are in danger of being beaten, stabbed, or strangled to death.”

The publication also shares that many high-profile inmates are currently housed at Coleman including Leonard Peltier, Amine El-Khalifi, and James “Whitey” Bulger.

Nassar was a former USA Gymnastics doctor as well as a doctor at Michigan State University who was found guilty of sexual misconduct. As the Inquisitr shared, Nassar will spend the rest of his days behind bars as he was sentenced to 40 – 175 years in prison for seven counts of criminal sexual conduct in addition to two other convictions for criminal sexual conduct and child pornography.

During his trial in Lansing, Michigan, 169 impact statements were read and it took seven days for each victim to read their statement. Additionally, Nassar released a statement of his own after hearing the words of all of his victims.

“Your words these past several days — their words, your words — have had a significant emotional effect on myself and has shaken me to my core. I also recognize that what I am feeling pales in comparison to the pain, trauma, and emotional destruction that all of you are feeling. There are no words that can describe the depth and breadth of how sorry I am for what has occurred. An acceptable apology to all of you is impossible to write and convey. I will carry your words with me for the rest of my days.”

Nassar is currently 55-years-old.