YouTube Gamer Drives McLaren 100MPH Wrong Way On Highway To Commit Suicide, Killing Mother And Young Daughter

Supporters of Trevor 'OG McSkillet' Heitmann reportedly blamed the young man's apparent suicide on Valve, which had banned him from selling 'Counter-Strike: Global Offensive' inventory online.

YouTube Gamer Drives McLaren 100MPH Wrong Way On Highway To Commit Suicide, Killing Mother And Young Daughter
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Supporters of Trevor 'OG McSkillet' Heitmann reportedly blamed the young man's apparent suicide on Valve, which had banned him from selling 'Counter-Strike: Global Offensive' inventory online.

YouTuber and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive gamer Trevor Heitmann was identified on Friday as the driver of a McLaren 650S that went the wrong way in traffic on a San Diego highway on Thursday, killing the sports car’s driver and the two occupants of another vehicle the car crashed into.

According to the Daily Mail, police reports show that the 18-year-old Heitmann, who was known in the gaming community as “OG McSkillet,” was speeding in his McLaren on Thursday afternoon, driving in the wrong direction on I-805 HOV, where he crashed into the Hyundai SUV driven by marriage and family therapist Aileen Pizarro. The 43-year-old Pizarro and her 12-year-old daughter, Aryana, were both killed after Heitmann’s McLaren crashed into their vehicle.

Heitmann was then identified as the sports car’s driver, first unofficially by his friends and YouTube followers, then on a more official basis on Friday, as the California Highway Patrol announced in a Friday press conference.

While Trevor Heitmann’s motives have yet to be confirmed, the Daily Mail wrote that several Twitter users have speculated that the crash was a suicide attempt that took place months after he was sanctioned by Counter-Strike: Global Offensive co-developer and publisher Valve. A gaming celebrity who had about 900,000 subscribers on YouTube, Heitmann was banned earlier this year from selling CS:GO skins, or virtual textures, due to his alleged involvement with a Counter-Strike gambling site. This reportedly led to him losing about $100,000 worth of in-game inventory.

About 30 minutes prior to the fatal crash on I-805 HOV, Trevor Heitmann was also allegedly spotted driving his car through the gates of Ashley Falls Elementary School in San Diego. While there were concerns that he might have been attempting to injure children at the school, no one was reported hurt during that incident.

“I was worried he was going to hit the two people standing at the gate,” witness Alec Galloway told Fox 5 San Diego.

“They stood in the middle trying to stop him, doing hand motions but he didn’t stop at all. If they didn’t move they would’ve got run over… he didn’t stop his car, he just kept accelerating and the gate busted open when he hit it.”

As quoted by the Daily Mail, Aileen Pizarro’s oldest son, 22-year-old Dominic, was devastated upon hearing that his mother and younger sister were killed on Thursday. He referred to his mother as a “selfless” person who, together with her father, raised him, Aryana, and their 19-year-old brother Angelo.

“She was a girly-girl, but she was also tough. She was alive with energy,” said Dominic Pizarro, describing his younger sister, who was supposed to start the seventh grade on Monday.

Although Trevor Heitmann never used his real name or showed his face on his gaming channel, he showed off the black McLaren 650S he reportedly drove during his supposed suicide attempt, boasting that it could “[beat] just about every other top supercar” in a drag race. He claimed to have been able to afford such an expensive car because of the “ton of money” he made through the CS:GO weapon skins he sold online.

In the aftermath of his apparent suicide, the Daily Mail noted that Heitmann’s friends and followers paid tribute to the young man, while also accusing Valve of leading him down a dark path by banning him from selling weapon skins. Furthermore, a friend suggested that Heitmann, who had stopped posting on social media in February after his ban, was “going through a hard time” prior to his death.


If you or someone you know is in crisis, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting TALK to 741741. For readers outside the U.S., visit Suicide.org or Befrienders Worldwide for international resources you can use to find help.