Snow White’s Mirror Is Here, Except This One Analyzes Your Flaws Like Zits And Wrinkles

A new, technologically advanced mirror called HiMirror analyzes all of your flaws.

HiMirror could be bad for mental health.
BrAt82 / Shutterstock

A new, technologically advanced mirror called HiMirror analyzes all of your flaws.

Mirror, mirror, on the wall, Tell me all of my facial flaws — in great detail. That’s what the makers of HiMirror Mini hope you’ll want. The new innovation on an age-old beauty item, the mirror, takes things to the extreme by offering a detailed analysis of all of your flaws. From zits, wrinkles, dark spots, pores, and more, the HiMirror Mini offers information like you’ve never had before.

Not only will the HiMirror Mini analyze all of your unfortunate flaws, it will also make suggestions on which creams, ointments, or other treatments could help cure your flaws. You will then have the option of keeping a daily diary to track your treatment’s effectiveness, detailed the Telegraph.

The hi-tech mirror also collects voice recordings, your health history, health conditions, and photos. It will then share the information with third parties, in order to make skincare suggestions. And this means that companies, for the first time ever, could track their customers to an astonishing degree.

A spokesman for the company explained the thought process behind the new technology.

“The rise of fitness trackers and healthcare monitors is testament to more people wanting to learn more about their own bodies, in order to make informed decisions. Technology like ours gives people the insight and understanding they need to do so. Only individuals aged 13 plus can create a HiMirror account to track their data, but ultimately the HiMirror is designed for adults and is priced accordingly.”

However, mental health professionals warn of the potential damage that the mirror could cause on emotionally vulnerable people.

Being told on a regular basis about one’s flaws could be highly detrimental, especially for people who are highly critical of themselves or have insecurities. The mirror could cause people to obsess over minor flaws, especially since it quantifies “flaws” in a way that’s never been possible before.

Also, the sharing of highly sensitive data gathered by the mirror with third parties is a point of contention for anyone with privacy concerns.

However, people who love to have the latest technology at their fingertips could find the mirror alluring. It even offers an Alexa-integrated interface, along with an entertainment center with weather, makeup tutorials, and even music, reported CNET.

A reporter that tried the facial analysis was told she needed help with her dark circles. It suggested she get more sleep and use a better concealer. Whether information like this is insulting or helpful is up to the consumer to decide.