Kim Kardashian Made $500,000 In One Instagram Post Advertising Morning Sickness Pill Called Diclegis

Kim Kardashian cashed in $500,000 for just one Instagram post where she helped promote a morning sickness pill.

Kim made $500,000 peddling pharmaceuticals to her followers.
Jordan Strauss / Invision/AP Images

Kim Kardashian cashed in $500,000 for just one Instagram post where she helped promote a morning sickness pill.

Companies know the power that celebrities and influencers have on their followers. So it’s not surprising that some of them would reach out to someone like Kim Kardashian for a little marketing help. With over 114 million followers on Instagram, her posts routinely get one to over 3 million likes.

So when the pharmaceutical company, Duchesnay USA, wanted to reach a bunch of their potential customers, they made perhaps a smart, strategic move: They asked Kim to pose holding a bottle of their morning sickness drug, Diclegis, and then supplied her with the text to put in the captions. And voila, Kim had made half a million dollars, according to Hello Giggles.

The FDA cracked down on the original post from 2015, though, because it failed to include the potential side effects and warnings. However, Kim later posted another Diclegis Instagram post in 2017, which is still up and has all of the side effects listed in the captions. Nobody knows how much she made for the 2017 post.

Although the deal happened years before, people are just now finding out the huge payday for Kim. As Hollywood Life put it, Kim made more money posting one Instagram post than President Trump makes in an entire year of being the commander of the free world (which is only $400,000). Sure, she had to take the right photo for her Instagram page, which arguably took some time, but it’s certainly nothing at all like navigating a year’s worth of politics and hundreds of politicians.

#Ad #DYK 4 million babies are born each year in the US. That means a lot of my US followers are mommies2B who could have morning sickness like I did! I want to share what helped me: Diclegis® (doxylamine succinate/pyridoxine HCl), the only FDA-approved medication for morning sickness when diet & lifestyle changes fail. My doctor assured me that it’s safe & effective for mom & baby. It’s also easy to recognize – it has the cutest pregnant lady on it! #DontSufferinSilence you’re not alone! If you have morning sickness, ask your healthcare provider if #Diclegis is right for you. The most common side effect of Diclegis is drowsiness. Diclegis.com US Residents Only Diclegis is a prescription medicine used to treat nausea & vomiting of pregnancy in women who haven’t improved with change in diet or other non-medicine treatments. Limitation of Use: Diclegis hasn’t been studied in women with hyperemesis gravidarum. Important Safety Information Don’t take Diclegis if you’re allergic to any of the ingredients in Diclegis. You should also not take Diclegis in combination with medicines called monoamine oxidase inhibitors, as these medicines can intensify & prolong the adverse CNS effects of Diclegis. Don’t drive, operate heavy machinery or other activities that need your full attention unless your healthcare provider says that you may do so. Don’t drink alcohol or take other central nervous system depressants such as cough & cold medicines, certain pain medicines & medicines that help you sleep while you take Diclegis. Severe drowsiness can happen or become worse causing falls or accidents. It is not known if Diclegis is safe & effective in children under 18 years of age. Keep Diclegis & all medicines out of the reach of children. Tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you’re breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. Diclegis can pass into your breast milk & may harm your baby. You shouldn’t breastfeed while using Diclegis. Additional safety information can be found at DiclegisImportantSafetyinfo.com. Duchesnay USA encourages you to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit fda.gov/medwatch or

A post shared by Kim Kardashian West (@kimkardashian) on

And was the marketing ploy successful? It appears that it was. Apparently, Diclegis sales increased by 21 percent after Kim’s 2015 post, which certainly put the company in the green, even with the huge payout to Kim.

The 2015 post had this caption, reported the Daily Mail.

“OMG. Have you heard about this? As you guys know my #morningsickness has been pretty bad. I tried changing things about my lifestyle, like my diet, but nothing helped, so I talked to my doctor…. He prescribed me #Diclegis, and I felt a lot better and most importantly, it’s been studied and there was no increased risk to the baby. I’m so excited and happy with my results that I’m partnering with Duchesnay USA to raise awareness about treating morning sickness…. If you have morning sickness, be safe and sure to ask your doctor about the pill with the pregnant woman on it and find out more.”

Although it reads like an ad campaign, some unsuspecting fans may have believed it to be a genuine recommendation from Kim. And even though the FDA pushed back and the original post was taken down, the company had already gotten what it needed: tons of publicity, targeted to a very specific demographic.

#Ad Nothing ever stopped me from being me until #morningsickness. You know how sick I was while pregnant; I could barely get out of bed. That was before I found a safe & effective med to treat my morning sickness when diet & lifestyle changes didn’t help. I hear there’s a new formulation of the drug combination I took that’s made to work faster & longer. If you’re pregnant & feeling sick & changing your diet & lifestyle doesn’t work, ask your doctor about Bonjesta® (doxylamine succinate/pyridoxine HCl). Most common side effect is drowsiness. Bonjesta.com for safety info. For U.S. residents only. INDICATION Bonjesta® is a prescription medicine to treat nausea & vomiting of pregnancy in women who haven’t improved with change in diet/other non-medicine treatments. Bonjesta® hasn’t been studied in children under 18. LIMITATIONS OF USE It isn’t known if Bonjesta® is safe & effective in women with severe nausea & vomiting of pregnancy (hyperemesis gravidarum). Women with this condition may need to be hospitalized. SELECT SAFETY INFORMATION Don’t take Bonjesta® if you’re allergic to doxylamine succinate, other ethanolamine derivative antihistamines, pyridoxine hydrochloride or any ingredients in Bonjesta®. See Patient Information leaflet for complete list of ingredients. Don’t take Bonjesta® in combination with medicines called MAOIs, as these medicines can intensify & prolong adverse central nervous system (CNS) effects of Bonjesta®. Ask your healthcare provider/pharmacist if you aren’t sure if you take an MAOI. The most common side effect of Bonjesta® is drowsiness. Don’t drive, operate heavy machinery or do other activities that need your full attention unless your healthcare provider says you can. Don’t drink alcohol, or take other CNS depressants such as cough & cold medicines, certain pain medicines & medicines that help you sleep while taking Bonjesta®. Severe drowsiness can happen or become worse causing falls/accidents. Bonjesta® may result in false positive urine drug screening for methadone, opiates and PCP. Duchesnay USA encourages you to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088

A post shared by Kim Kardashian West (@kimkardashian) on

Recent Instagram posts by Kim show her also posing with a bottle of Bonjesta, which was posted on June 20. Bonjesta is also a morning sickness pill by Duchesnay USA. Maybe in a year or two, we’ll find out exactly how much Kim made with that post.