Kate Middleton’s Christening Headpiece Sparks Confusion On Twitter

The Duchess of Cambridge is known for her stylish hats, but this one left fans confused.

Dominic Lipinski / Getty Images

The Duchess of Cambridge is known for her stylish hats, but this one left fans confused.

Kate Middleton made a major fashion statement at her son’s christening, but Twitter fans aren’t sure exactly what to call the look. The Duchess of Cambridge wore an Alexander McQueen dress to the christening of her son, Prince Louis, but it was her headgear that had tongues wagging. Kate Middleton wore a white floral headpiece created by her longtime hat designer Jane Taylor, according to The Mirror. But many followers couldn’t decide what to call the unique piece.

Social media was set afire after the Duchess was photographed in her christening attire as fans couldn’t seem to agree on what to call Kate’s latest headpiece. Some fans posted to social media about Kate’s hat, while others described it as a headband, fascinator, or bandeau. The unique design was even compared to a Russian tiara called a Kokoshnik by one confused fan.

The Mirror noted that Kate Middleton has worn outfits by her favorite designer, Alexander McQueen, for all three of her children’s christenings, but her buzzy headpiece at Prince Louis’ ceremony is definitely a first.

Lovehats.com described the unique piece as “a personalized version of a Jane Taylor SS18 headpiece/headband,” but not everyone was in agreement as to what to call it.

You can check out the Twitter reaction to the Duchess of Cambridge’s latest fashion statement below.

Kate Middleton has long fascinated fans with her trademark headwear. Ever since she has been in the public eye as Prince William’s girlfriend and then his royal wife, Kate has been photographed wearing hats, fascinators, beanies and more, including the memorable “Potato Chip Hat” she wore to a July 2011 wedding.

Middleton’s hatmaker, Jane Taylor, previously told Vanity Fair she couldn’t specifically discuss how she approaches designing christening hats for the Duchess, but she did reveal that it usually takes her four to six weeks to create a hat and that she always makes sure it’s a suitable design for the occasion.

“I would never put any of my clients in a hat that wouldn’t work for the occasion,” Taylor told Vanity Fair. “So obviously things like the Royal Ascot are completely different to the christening. If it’s a daytime christening, you’re not going to have a lot of crystals and things like that. Whereas if it’s the [Royal Ascot horse race], you can go completely over the top and have beautiful feathers and veiling and make a really show-stopping piece.”

For more on Kate Middleton’s hat history, check out the video below.