JetBlue Flight Crew Jumps Into Action To Help Dog Running Out Of Oxygen

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A couple travelling from Florida to Massachusetts gave high praise to the two JetBlue flight attendants who came to the rescue of their 3-year-old French bulldog who was suffering from hypoxia.

According to the New York Daily News, Steven and Michele Burt were traveling to Worcester with their three small dogs when their French bulldog, Darcy, became anxious in her carrier. Mrs. Burt noticed that her dog’s tongue had turned blue and placed Darcy on her lap to calm her down.

JetBlue flight attendants, Renaud and Diane, seemed to notice Darcy’s distress and sprang into action. They brought Mrs. Burt some ice, water, and an oxygen mask for Darcy immediately.

The French bulldog seemed to be suffering from hypoxia, otherwise known as lack of oxygen flowing through the blood. Some symptoms of hypoxia that pet owners should watch out for include dizziness, shortness of breath, and mental confusion, stated General Aviation News. Some owners who take their furry friends on flights have also noticed that their pets can get lethargic, are unable to walk straight, and that their behavior is a bit off for at least an hour after landing.

There are ways to prevent hypoxia in pets during a flight. For instance, pet owners Kent and Lori Carter developed an oxygen delivery hood for their dogs. The Carters are experienced pilots themselves and worked on the hoods when they learned the effects of hypoxia on their two male Brussels Griffons, Cody and Moe.

The couple established 4 Paws Aviation where they did research on the hoods with the help of several volunteer animals. According to Lori, their research reveals that animals can suffer from low blood oxygen levels starting at 8,000 feet, which could explain Darcy’s attack.

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The Burts were very grateful to the attentive flight attendants. Michele Burt, in particular, stated, “good people are doing good things on a daily basis even if it is in small ways or big ways” She even sent a letter to JetBlue praising Renaud and Diane for their help which the airline replied to in a statement to ABC News.

“We all want to make sure everyone has a safe and comfortable flight, including those with four legs. We’re thankful for our crew’s quick thinking and glad everyone involved was breathing easier when the plane landed in Worcester.”

JetBlue also responded directly to Mrs. Burt’s letter in private.

“It was a pleasure to read your message and we’re happy to hear that Renaud and Diane went above and beyond in helping you and Darcy especially handle the flight better!”