Sean Spicer, Former Trump Press Secretary, Gets New Job As Talk Show Host

Sean Spicer attends the White House Correspondents' Weekend
Shannon Finney / Getty Images for Capitol File

Former press secretary during the Donald Trump administration, Sean Spicer, may have finally landed a new job. After getting fired by the president, he’s trying to enter his former boss’ arena as a television star. Apparently tired of being the one to answer the questions, Spicer will now be the one asking them in a new pilot he’s shooting that will make him a talk show host, reports Deadline. Common Ground will be shot in Washington. While Spicer earned his notoriety by proclaiming the crowd at the president’s inaugural “was the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period,” he became even more famous to the masses when Melissa McCarthy, who won an Emmy for her performance, impersonated him on Saturday Night Live.

But is all of that enough to make people watch a talk show with him as host? While no network is attached at this point, the production company, Debmar-Mercury, along with partner Pilgrim Media Group, are banking on it. The New York Times reports that “the show would feature Spicer interviewing public figures and have respectful conversations on topics ranging from the media to sports to marriage.” Stormy Daniels’ attorney, Michael Avenatti, announced on Twitter he was approached to be a guest.

“I turned down Sean Spicer for his new show despite the fact that it would have been YUGE with the biggest ratings since the Apprentice and the largest live audience since the 2017 Inauguration (which was the largest ever on record)!!!!!!!!!” Avenatti wrote, making it the one place the lawyer seemingly won’t appear these days. There hasn’t been any word on which guests will appear, as yet. Details, in general, are scarce but there was a little information revealed by Spicer, mostly on why he agreed to take this next step in his career.

“In this current environment, I think it’s important to have a platform where we can have civil, respectful, and informative discussions on the issues of the day,” Spicer told the New York Times of the show. Deadline noted that Spicer “already has a podcast, Everything’s Going to be All Right, with conservative writer Katie Pavlich, and has written a book about his can-you-believe-he-was-only-there-six-months in the White House. It’s set to drop next month.” Will he be able to parlay these different avenues into enough of an audience to keep his show afloat in this extremely competitive market? The bigger question is will a network give him the chance.