Sting Speaks Out Against Trump At An Amnesty International Event, Calling Policies ‘Barbaric’

The former 'Police' singer spoke to a crowd in Athens, Greece, about world leaders.

Sting attends the 2018 American Ballet Theatre Spring Gala at The Metropolitan Opera House
Roy Rochlin / Getty Images

The former 'Police' singer spoke to a crowd in Athens, Greece, about world leaders.

Musician Sting spoke out about Trump’s border policies at an Amnesty International event, calling the American president and other world leaders pathetic. Sting says he is incredibly sympathetic toward the refugees being detained.

Page Six says Sting spoke to an audience in Greece about the Trump policy of separating children from their parents and was critical of all world leaders, whom he calls “a sad parade of half-men and cowards” for their failure to help or feel compassion for those caught in the refugee crisis. He added that Trump’s policy is “brutal” and “barbaric.”

Sting praised Greece for understanding how refugees need to be treated and hope the rest of the world wakes up.

“Thank God for Greece because you have shown the way. You have shown how to treat refugees when other people are building walls. When children are being taken from their mothers and put in cages, you are acting with compassion.”

The former Police frontman was speaking ahead of a meeting of European Union leaders in the hope that they would at least hear the outcry. The Amnesty International event took place days after first lady Melania Trump visited a detention center on the southern U.S. border.

Sting is dismayed that leaders like Angela Merkel have tried to downplay the expectations that anything will come out of the upcoming EU meeting, says Yahoo. This meeting is only to address the European migrant crisis, and not what is going on at the border of Mexico and America. But Sting says he remains hopeful, as he visits Greece for two concerts.

Sting has toured recently with Shaggy, and he jokes that they are aware they are considered an odd couple, says Forbes. But Sting says that most men have a political bent.

On paper, well, it’s strange,” Sting says. “But then we have a lot in common. We’re both family men, elders, and voters.”

The setlist included a combination of the Police song “Roxanne” and “Boombastic,” harmonies along with Shaggy’s biggest hit “It Wasn’t Me,” and a singalong of “Angel.”

“Don’t Make Me Wait” is the top single that the two men created together, shooting the video in Shaggy’s hometown of Kingston, Jamaica. Sting says that their time in Jamaica ended up being one of the best parties of his life, and the people and the culture are special to both himself and obviously Shaggy.

But Sting also remembers darker times in Kingston.

“I hadn’t been for a long time, a couple of decades actually. It’s amazing how Kingston has changed, largely for the better. It feels very vibrant and positive. It wasn’t the most easy town to be in during the ’80s. Politically it was very febrile.”

But Sting says another thing that both men have in common is that they both came as migrants to the U.S.

“You know, we’re grown-ups, we look at the news with horror. That’s our job, to reflect the world that we perceive — in a way that’s first of all entertaining, but then if you scratch the surface there is a level of information that I think is important.”