Kate Spade Death: Cops Found Anxiety Meds, No Illegal Drugs After Designer’s Suicide

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Designer Kate Spade’s untimely death on June 5, 2018, left many questions unanswered as to why the designer chose to end her own life. TMZ revealed in a new report that cops found medication at the scene of Spade’s suicide, but no illegal drugs.

TMZ revealed that the New York Police Department “found a variety of anxiety meds at her death scene, but no illegal drugs.” The drugs found were prescribed to the designer. It was unclear if Spade had taken any of her prescribed medications before taking her own life. TMZ’s sources stated that detectives did not come across any illegal narcotics in the home.

Kate Spade had anxiety and depression for years, her husband said in a statement. She had been going to doctors and taking medicine for her disease for five years, he wrote.

TMZ reported that the iconic handbag designer had “fallen into a state of depression in the months leading up to her death after her husband, Andy Spade, had asked for a divorce.” Andy Spade confirmed that the couple had been living separately for 10 months, but continued to co-parent their 13-year-old daughter amicably.

“There was no indication and no warning that she would do this,” Spade said in a statement published by The New York Times. “It was a complete shock. And it clearly wasn’t her. There were personal demons she was battling.”

“Bea was living with both of us and we saw each other or spoke every day. We ate many meals together as a family and continued to vacation together as a family. Our daughter was our priority. We were not legally separated, and never even discussed divorce. We were best friends trying to work through our problems in the best way we knew how. We were together for 35 years. We loved each other very much and simply needed a break.”

Two weeks after the death of its co-founder, the brand Kate Spade New York announced that it will be donating $1 million to suicide prevention groups.

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“Mental illness does not discriminate; it is complicated and difficult to diagnose and can often be life-threatening,” Anna Bakst, CEO of Kate Spade New York, said in a statement published by People Magazine. “We hope that our support will shed even more light on the disease and encourage those who suffer from mental health issues to seek help. Collectively, we must all do more.”

The designer’s funeral is being held June 21 in Kansas City, Missouri, where she was born and raised.