Google’s Diversity Efforts Have Little Effect As Report Shows Company Is Still Mostly White, Male

Cars drive by Google's New York offices on March 5, 2018 in New York City. Published reports say that the tech giant is close to a reaching a $2.4 billion deal to buy the landmark Chelsea Market building. The building, a block-long former Nabisco factory that is named after its ground-floor gourmet food mall, sits directly across from Google's current New York City headquarters in the Meatpacking District. If the sale goes through, it would be one of the most expensive real estate transactions for a single building in New York City history.
Spencer Platt / Getty Images

In a diversity report issued by Google recently, a key point reveals that the company’s workforce is still mostly composed of white and male individuals.

Furthermore, the information in the report shows that Google has made barely any changes in this area since the last survey of their workforce was conducted.

The report has been issued as a supplemental measure to last week’s annual shareholder meeting, which showed employees pestering the massive tech giant to push for more diversity in the workforce.

This situation all comes amidst Google facing many current lawsuits regarding discrimination.

In the survey, it was found that 70 percent of Google’s workforce is composed of males, and 53 percent of the overall workforce is white. This number is the exact same as the number received when the report was conducted this time last year, an alarming bit of information for a company so entrapped in problems regarding race and gender relations.

Asians make up 36 percent of Google’s workforce, which is only 1.6 percent higher than last year, while African-Americans comprise 2.5 percent, then Latinos accounting for just 3.6 percent, with both increasing by 0.1 percent, respectively.

When it comes to executives and people in positions of power within the company, it was found that 67 percent of company leaders are white and 75 percent are male.

The report also showed an alarming fact that African American and Latino employees leave their positions at the company at a higher rate than anyone else.

All of this controversy comes at the heels of the actions of a certain employee last year, in a story reported by CNBC an engineer for the company, who wrote a controversial memo in which he stated that biological differences were to blame for a lack of female engineers.

James Damore, the man responsible, was immediately let go after the memo went viral for “advancing harmful gender stereotypes.”

Since this occurred, Google has dealt with a considerable amount of internal turmoil regarding race and gender bias.

Google to end Project Maven.
  MariaX / Shutterstock

However, the report in question did show a slight glimpse towards something better for the company.

Vice President Danielle Brown discussed in the diversity report that the tech giant’s diversity and inclusion works would make a change from a “primarily People Operations and grassroots-led model to one of shared ownership with Google’s most senior leaders.”

One major change in keeping ever-aware of their diversity analytics will be CEO Sundar Pichai now receiving the company’s workforce breakdown every two weeks as opposed to once a year, so that he can keep watchful eye “in real time in product areas” where it’s “falling short.”