Texas Man Felt Sympathy For 54 Immigrants Found Crammed Into Tractor Trailer, So He Bought Them All Pizza

Armando Colunga was assisted by three detectives in completing his mission.

Texas man feeds immigrants at US-Mexico border
John Moore / Getty Images

Armando Colunga was assisted by three detectives in completing his mission.

Even as polarization and partisan politics grip the country, there are always people who remind us about the basic goodness of humanity.

Texas man Armando Colunga was watching news Tuesday night when he saw a report about the discovery of 54 undocumented immigrants in the back of an 18-wheeler truck. The report suggested that the immigrants were detained by the authorities and were waiting with bated breath as the decision to transport them was being considered.

While most of us would have probably felt pity about their situation, very few of us would have actually done anything about it. Colunga, however, feeling sorry for the immigrants, felt compelled to do something about it.

He left his home and drove across town, where the immigrants were being kept, in his tow truck — still not sure why or what he was going to do to help the immigrants.

“My main motivation was, ‘Who knows how long they’ve been in there?'” he told CNN.

When he reached the scene, he saw a Caesars nearby and decided to buy seven large pizzas on a whim. He doubted the officers would allow him to give the pizzas to those who were being detained, but fortunately, two detectives — grasping his noble intention — escorted him past the yellow crime scene tape, where another detective handed the pizzas off to a fireman, who then distributed them to the waiting group.

Before he bought the pizzas, Colunga had no idea if the immigrants had been fed. But as the detectives told him, they had been given water but no food. The officers even told him he didn’t have to do what he was doing,

“I didn’t think about if it (the seven pizzas) would be enough — I just figured everyone would have something to eat.

“No I didn’t have to, but they’re my people.”

Colunga, whose family is of Mexican descent, said that he sympathizes with the Hispanic population that immigrates to the United States in search of a better life. But regardless of this affinity, Colunga said that he would feed any group of immigrants stuck in the same situation. For him, humanity cannot be compartmentalized into one race or ethnic background.

“If they were black or African people or white people coming from London… I would have done the same thing,” he insisted. “It’s not about race.”

Colunga still doesn’t know the names of the three officers who helped him distribute the pizzas to the unfed immigrants, but said his mission wouldn’t have been complete without them.