‘Star Trek’ Star Jon Paul Steuer’s Death Ruled A Suicide

CBS

Earlier this year, shockwaves were sent through the Star Trek fandom when Jon Paul Steuer, one of the stars of the show, was found dead in his hotel room.

Now, however, People Magazine has exclusively confirmed that the actor, who was only 33-years-old, died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head, thus ruling his death a suicide.

Steuer, who got his start as an actor on Star Trek — as well as on Little Giants — was only 33 when he passed away.

The actor, who went by the name Jonny Jewels when he sang lead vocals for the band P.R.O.B.L.E.M.S., had his death announced on Facebook by his bandmates, who shared the news “with heavy hearts” back in January.

The actor took his own life in Portland, OR.

Steuer played the son of Worf in a 1990 episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation.

The Star Trek actor is just the latest in a series of celebrity deaths by suicide.

Celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain was found dead by hanging in his Paris, France, hotel room last week. He was only 61-years-old. In addition, fashion designer Kate Spade was also found dead by suicide in New York, at the age of 55.

This has inspired many actors to speak out about mental health issues, encouraging both fans and other celebrities to talk about their mental health issues.

Jada Pinkett Smith, actress, wife, and mother, has been the one who has been most vocal about the importance of mental health. In an exclusive interview with People Magazine, Smith said that she frequently considered suicide and encouraged her fans to talk about their problems before taking a “permanent solution” to a “temporary problem.”

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Prior to the announcement of the demise of the Star Trek actor, Smith said that mental health is a “daily practice,” and can also be affected by external influences, such as the food you eat and the way you sleep.

Smith took to her Instagram to share a tribute to the two deceased stars and said that she hoped that they found peace in the afterlife — a peace, she said, that he couldn’t seem to find in life.

Our thoughts are with the entire Star Trek cast, crew, and fandom at this difficult time.


If you or someone you know is in crisis, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting TALK to 741741. For readers outside the U.S., visit Suicide.org or Befrienders Worldwide for international resources you can use to find help.